If you’re looking to get a jump start on your health and fitness goals this year, you may be thinking about trying the ketogenic diet. Maybe you’ve heard the phrase before — it’s a huge diet buzzword — but aren’t sure what it means. Here’s a primer: The ketogenic diet is an eating plan that drives your body into ketosis, a state where the body uses fat as a primary fuel source (instead of carbohydrates), says Stacey Mattinson, RDN, who is based in Austin, Texas.
“I recommend low-carbohydrate, high-fat (ketogenic) diets to almost all my patients to improve their quality of life. The LCHF diet reduces inflammation, promotes weight loss, and improves blood biomarkers without prescription agents. The result is improved sleep, sharper mental clarity, more energy throughout the day, and healthier relationships to food. Most patients suffer “fat phobia” but fat does not make you fat! Sugar does! We teach patients to eat lots of healthy fats and cycle in and out of ketosis. We refer everyone to Diet Doctor as a great resource, especially for the carb contents of various food and drinks.”

Prior to the advent of exogenous insulin for the treatment of diabetes mellitus in the 1920's, the mainstay of therapy was dietary modification. Diet recommendations in that era were aimed at controlling glycemia (actually, glycosuria) and were dramatically different from current low-fat, high-carbohydrate dietary recommendations for patients with diabetes [1,2]. For example, the Dr. Elliot Joslin Diabetic Diet in 1923 consisted of "meats, poultry, game, fish, clear soups, gelatin, eggs, butter, olive oil, coffee, tea" and contained approximately 5% of energy from carbohydrates, 20% from protein, and 75% from fat [3]. A similar diet was advocated by Dr. Frederick Allen of the same era [4].
In 1863, William Banting, a formerly obese English undertaker and coffin maker, published "Letter on Corpulence Addressed to the Public", in which he described a diet for weight control giving up bread, butter, milk, sugar, beer, and potatoes.[46] His booklet was widely read, so much so that some people used the term "Banting" for the activity usually called "dieting".[47]

The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain function. However, if little carbohydrate remains in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Around half of children and young people with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] Some evidence indicates that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] Potential side effects may include constipation, high cholesterol, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones.[3]

Carbohydrate: Most of what determines how ketogenic a diet is will depend on how much carbohydrate is eaten, as well the individual's metabolism and activity level. A diet of less than 50 or 60 grams of net (effective) carbohydrate per day is generally ketogenic. Some sources say to consume no more than 20 grams of carbohydrates per day, while others cite up to 50 grams, and many recommend no more than 5 percent of calories from carbs. However, athletes and people with healthy metabolisms may be able to eat 100 or more grams of net carbohydrate in a day and maintain a desired level of ketosis. At the same time, an older sedentary person with Type 2 diabetes may have to eat less than 30 net grams to achieve the same level.
“I have an interest in diabetes and preventative medicine and have started recommending intermittent fasting in combination with a low-carb, high-fat diet to all of my patients both for treatment and reversal of diabetes and general good health and prevention. I recommend the Diet Doctor website to all of my patients so they can find the best information from knowledgeable experts regarding living a low-carb lifestyle, from educational videos to amazing recipes and everything in between.”
May cause irregularity. Dramatically increasing your fat intake while drastically cutting your carb intake may cause gastrointestinal issues, ranging from constipation to diarrhea. This is something that should resolve itself when your body gets fat-adapted [5]. There is also the potential for nausea, particularly when switching from a low-fat diet to the ketogenic diet. It can take a while for the gall bladder, pancreas, and liver to adapt to digesting high amounts of fat [17].
Keto Shop and the parent brand KetoGenics™ was developed with the needs of the low carb, ketogenic community in mind. In addition, those who follow Intermittent Fasting will also benefit from our products. More products are being added to the KetoGenics™ line up on a monthly or semi-monthly bases so please be sure to check back often. Future products will include a small to moderate line of supplements tailored to those who follow a low carb, ketogenic lifestyle. In addition to low carb support, there will also be supportive supplements for those who follow an Intermittent Fasting eating regimen. 

In theory, a ketogenic diet that increases carbohydrate loads for cardio exercise seems perfect. However, the side effects of a ketogenic diet can include dehydration, malnutrition and constipation. According to the Mayo Clinic website, ketogenic plans also can lead to kidney stones. In addition, the ketogenic diet does not give you the nutrition you need to be healthy. Instead, try cutting portion sizes and counting calories; this also can force your body to burn fat while still providing you with balanced nutrition, including proteins, carbohydrates, fiber and fat. As with any diet, you should discuss a ketogenic diet with your doctor.
“When the low-fat dietary advice I had been preaching for decades didn’t work for me in middle age, I changed to low-carb. After mentorship from Dr. Eric Westman, I introduced low-carb to my patients with astonishing results reversing diseases I had only been “managing”. In fact, more than 90% of patients who come to me on insulin are able to come off. I run a multidisciplinary medical weight loss clinic helping to restore health. This has brought the joy back into medicine for me. Diet Doctor has been an amazing resource to help me and my patients in this journey.”

Following a ketogenic diet puts your body into a state of “ketosis,” which is a metabolic state that occurs when most of the body’s energy comes from ketone bodies in the blood, rather than from glucose from carbohydrate foods (like grains, all sources of sugar or fruit, for example). This is in contrast to a glycolytic state, where blood glucose (sugar) provides most of the body’s fuel (or energy).
“I started a low-carb, high-fat diet for myself in an attempt to treat my own health problems. Since then, I have seen significant health benefits not only in myself but also in many of my patients using a LCHF/ketogenic approach. Diet Doctor gives a simple but very effective evidence-based resource that I confidently recommend to all my patients. And the recipes are great!”

Yeah so there definitely is a sweet spot for maintaining ketosis and the weight loss benfits(via body getting energy by burning fat for ketones and fatty acids as opposed to carbohydrates for glycogen.) yet still consuming enough carbs where you aren’t suffering from malnutrition or whatever it is that’s causing your fatigue every afternoon. Their are are couple ways to find and ride within this “golden” range. Possibly easiest is to take some coconut oil or similar high fat, high calorie, medium chain triglyceride supplement. This will likely ensure sufficient caloric intake and you can also eat more carbs while maintaing a sufficient fat:carb ratio to remain in ketosis. I hesitate to toss out a number but maybe 40-50g net carbs per day will be okay as long as your taking the supplement. Another way(the one I’d probably reccomend) is to slowly increase your carb intake 5g / day / week. As you do this continue to test ketone levels in the pee to determine at which amount of carbs per day you slip out of ketosis then just eat a little less carbs per day then that number. This is best because it requires no supplement, you’ll learn more about your body, and it will lower ketone levels which, although good for the brain in smaller amounts, in large amounts WILL cause ketoacidosis and raise the bloods Ph in which can cause kidney stones via bone demineralization along with a whole host of other complications including coma (likely one of the reasons you’ve been feeling crappy-too many ketones) third: eat the amount of carbs just above your ketosis inducing threshold level, you’ll still likely lose weight because even at carb levels just above ketosis range you’ll still experience less hunger sensations(a benefit of burning ketones and fatty acids for energy and not glycogen) and so eat less. I hope you find this helpful. *note: I am not a medical professional this information is the result of personal curiosity and independent reaearch.

“I have been working as an internal medicine doctor and diabetologist for over 20 years, focusing on gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and also teaching future doctors and nutritionists. In 2016, we corrected our official dietary guidelines for GDM, removing the minimum recommended intake of carbohydrates and setting a maximum at 200 grams a day, with low-carbohydrate diets as an option. I would like to thank GDM dietitian Lily Nichols, Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt at Diet Doctor and the entire LCHF community for improving outcomes of Czech women with GDM and other patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome.”

“As a full-spectrum family physician since 2004, luckily I stumbled on the wonderful low-carb community two years ago after my amazing wife was forced to make dietary changes after surgery. I’ve never looked back! After transforming my own health, with help from resources like Diet Doctor, Jimmy Moore, and Dr. Jason Fung, I’ve committed to bettering the lives of my patients with intensive dietary management through LCHF and intermittent fasting. Empowering patients to make these lifestyle changes has truly brought back the joy of medicine for me. I am so thankful to all who have inspired me along the way.”


Infants and patients fed via a gastrostomy tube can also be given a ketogenic diet. Parents make up a prescribed powdered formula, such as KetoCal, into a liquid feed.[19] Gastrostomy feeding avoids any issues with palatability, and bottle-fed infants readily accept the ketogenic formula.[31] Some studies have found this liquid feed to be more efficacious and associated with lower total cholesterol than a solid ketogenic diet.[18] KetoCal is a nutritionally complete food containing milk protein and is supplemented with amino acids, fat, carbohydrate, vitamins, minerals and trace elements. It is used to administer the 4:1 ratio classic ketogenic diet in children over one year. The formula is available in both 3:1 and 4:1 ratios, either unflavoured or in an artificially sweetened vanilla flavour and is suitable for tube or oral feeding.[51] Other formula products include KetoVolve[52] and Ketonia.[53] Alternatively, a liquid ketogenic diet may be produced by combining Ross Carbohydrate Free soy formula with Microlipid and Polycose.[53]
“As a psychiatrist who practices traditional and holistic (integrative) psychiatry, I find my patients are always looking for non-pharmacological ways to improve both their psychological and physical health. Diet Doctor has proven to be an excellent and reliable resource to help my patients develop and maintain healthy lifestyle choices with low-carb and ketogenic diets. My patients are thrilled with the extensive variety of recipe options that are easy to prepare as well as the informative videos on relevant health issues. I am equally thrilled with the positive benefits in my patients’ mood, anxiety, and cognitive clarity.”
To drill down further, there are some genetic enzyme defects that cause problems with ketosis. Here are a few of note: carnitine deficiency (primary), carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) I or II deficiency, carnitine translocase deficiency, beta-oxidation defects—mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (mHMGS) deficiency, medium-chain acyl dehydrogenase deficiency (MCAD).
As the popularity of the Keto Diet has exploded in recent years the true nature of Ketogenic weight loss has gotten blurred. So what is Keto? Very simply Keto refers to Ketosis, the state into which your body enters when it shifts to burning fat for energy instead of carbohydrates. As carbohydrates and sugar intake is restricted, your body begins to break down its fat stores to use as a source of energy. Therefore, the very basics of a Ketogenic Diet are:
Cholesterol serves a number of important roles in the body. First of all, cholesterol is a critical structural element in certain tissues such as our brain and nervous system. In fact, it is estimated that around 25% of our cholesterol can be found in the brain. Just to highlight our failed fat philosophy over the years, higher saturated fat intake and high cholesterol levels are associated with better mental function in old age (1)!

Although the patients underwent a total of 10 visits, the complete body composition analyses were synchronized with the ketone levels in 4 visits (Table 1; Fig. 1). Visit C-1 was the baseline visit, before starting the diet, with no ketosis (0.0 ± 0.1 mmol/L) and a body weight of 95.9 ± 16.3 kg. Visit C-2 was at the time of maximum level of ketosis (1.0 ± 0.6 mmol/L) with a body weight of 84.2 ± 18.0 kg. At visit C-3 (after 89.7 ± 19.1 days of VLCK), patients began the return to a normal diet and showed a reduction in ketone levels (0.7 ± 0.5 mmol/L) and a body weight of 76.6 ± 11.1 kg. Finally, at visit C-4, the patients were out of ketosis (0.2 ± 0.1 mmol/L) and showed a body weight of 75.1 ± 11.8 kg. All weights were statistically different from baseline levels (P < 0.05; Table 1; Fig. 1).


Thanks for this inputs. 20 years ago I gain 17 pounds a year for 5 years. I was healthy but my dr told me start diet, any diet just come back in a month I want to see you start loosing… I started Atkins and lost 7 pound in a month. She was checking my progress every six months and checking my condition. I lost 64 pounds in 3 years. Now I started eating out of control. I am eating healthy but too much… I gain 40 pound back after 20 years. Now I will start again my Atkins to take off 30 pounds…
When ketone bodies accumulate in the blood, this is called ketosis. Healthy individuals naturally experience mild ketosis during periods of fasting (e.g., sleeping overnight) and very strenuous exercise. Proponents of the ketogenic diet state that if the diet is carefully followed, blood levels of ketones should not reach a harmful level (known as “ketoacidosis”) as the brain will use ketones for fuel, and healthy individuals will typically produce enough insulin to prevent excessive ketones from forming. [2] How soon ketosis happens and the number of ketone bodies that accumulate in the blood is variable from person to person and depends on factors such as body fat percentage and resting metabolic rate. [3]
“Our medical practice was featured implementing a low-carbohydrate plan for a patient with type 2 diabetes in the documentary The Magic Pill. We believe food can be used as medicine. Many of our patients with insulin resistance, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, PCOS and more will see excellent results and resolution of chronic disease states with low-carbohydrate diets. Education and understanding as to which dietary strategy is best for the individual is essential in reclaiming one’s health. There is no doubt in my mind that low-carbohydrate planning can be extremely useful and safe for the appropriate clinical scenario.” 

^ Davies MJ, D'Alessio DA, Fradkin J, Kernan WN, Mathieu C, Mingrone G, et al. (2018). "Management of Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes, 2018. A Consensus Report by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD)". Diabetes Care. 41 (12): 2669–2701. doi:10.2337/dci18-0033. PMC 6245208. PMID 30291106. Low-carbohydrate, low glycemic index, and high-protein diets, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet all improve glycemic control, but the effect of the Mediterranean eating pattern appears to be the greatest
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