Much of the research into low-carbohydrate dieting has been of poor quality and studies which reported large effects have garnered disproportionate attention in comparison to those which are methodologically sound.[5] Higher quality studies tend to find no meaningful difference in outcome between low-fat and low-carbohydrate dieting.[5] Low-quality meta-analyses have tended to report favourably on the effect of low-carbohydrate diets: a systematic review found that 9 out of 10 meta-analyses with positive conclusions were affected by publication bias.[5]
“I discovered the ketogenic diet in 2017 and since then I have come to truly believe it is the metabolic and nutritional pathway to overall health. Hippocrates once stated, ‘All disease begins in the gut” and I now truly believe the right food can cure. I am now discouraging patients from undergoing bariatric surgery too soon and advising them to try the keto diet first. Diet Doctor gives people the knowledge they need. It is a place where everyone can go to learn and have fun with this nutritional approach.”
From an outpatient clinic, we recruited 28 overweight participants with type 2 diabetes for a 16-week single-arm pilot diet intervention trial. We provided LCKD counseling, with an initial goal of <20 g carbohydrate/day, while reducing diabetes medication dosages at diet initiation. Participants returned every other week for measurements, counseling, and further medication adjustment. The primary outcome was hemoglobin A1c.
If you’re one of the lucky people that have a dehydrator, you can take serious advantage of it by dehydrating thin slices of vegetables overnight (normally 12 hours) to get crisp, perfect vegetables that you can eat as snacks. Do this with zucchini, radish, or jicama. If you’re not lucky enough to have a dehydrator (like me), then you can easily make cheese chips in the oven and flavor them with your own spices!
In regard to serum measurements, the mean fasting glucose decreased by 17% from 9.08 ± 4.09 mmol/L at baseline to 7.57 ± 2.63 mmol/L at week 16 (p = 0.04) (Table ​(Table4).4). Serum sodium and chloride levels increased significantly, but only by 1% and 3%, respectively. Uric acid level decreased by 10% (p = 0.01). Serum triglyceride decreased 42% from 2.69 ± 2.87 mmol/L to 1.57 ± 1.38 mmol/L (p = 0.001). Increases occurred in both high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (8%) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (10%) but these changes were of borderline statistical significance (p = 0.08 and p = 0.1, respectively). The following blood tests did not change significantly: total cholesterol, potassium, bicarbonate, urea nitrogen, creatinine, calcium, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and hemoglobin.
The primary outcome was the change from baseline to week 16 in hemoglobin A1c. Changes in all variables were analyzed by the paired t-test or Wilcoxon signed-ranks test, as appropriate. Linear regression analysis was used to examine predictors of change in hemoglobin A1c. A p value of 0.05 or less was considered statistically significant. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS version 8.02 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC).
“I encourage my patients to do fasting coupled with a very-low-carbohydrate, whole-foods diet because of the astounding biochemical and clinical improvements these interventions provide, in terms of managing chronic metabolic illnesses like diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. I invite my patients to go to Diet Doctor because it is a very reliable source of information for people following a low-carbohydrate diet.”
Dear Martina, I wasn’t sure how to contact you. I am a final year undergraduate Human Nutrition student. I was also a keto diet follower and your app and blogs were a great help. For my final year project I‘ve chosen to study the present awareness of the ketogenic diet. I would like to ask if you would be interested to present my questionnaire to your followers. I will of course send you the questionnaire personally first for your approval. Please let me know if you are interested. Thank you for your hard work. You are a great help for many of us.
"Obese. That's what the doc said. He said if I didn't change I'd be Morbidly Obese. So stopped eating big macs and started out by walking. But it wasn't really enough to undo the damage. Then I found on Shark Tank. So I found it online and ordered it. I figured, it was worth a shot. I'm glad I did. It jumpstarted my weight loss! I started shedding the weight. I'm down 60 pounds after just 9 months! Thank you - you really saved my life!"
The Bulletproof Diet (download the roadmap for free here) counters these side effects by keeping protein levels even lower. It is a cyclical ketogenic diet, which means you eat keto for 5-6 days a week and then do a weekly protein fast, which lowers inflammation and kickstarts fat-burning. This is much better for your body and spurs weight loss even more. The Bulletproof Diet also involves a carb re-feed day, where you eat slightly more carbs than usual. Since keto diets mimic starvation, you want to make sure your body knows that food isn’t scarce (this is especially important for women trying to conceive).
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