In the 1960s, medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) were found to produce more ketone bodies per unit of energy than normal dietary fats (which are mostly long-chain triglycerides).[15] MCTs are more efficiently absorbed and are rapidly transported to the liver via the hepatic portal system rather than the lymphatic system.[16] The severe carbohydrate restrictions of the classic ketogenic diet made it difficult for parents to produce palatable meals that their children would tolerate. In 1971, Peter Huttenlocher devised a ketogenic diet where about 60% of the calories came from the MCT oil, and this allowed more protein and up to three times as much carbohydrate as the classic ketogenic diet. The oil was mixed with at least twice its volume of skimmed milk, chilled, and sipped during the meal or incorporated into food. He tested it on 12 children and adolescents with intractable seizures. Most children improved in both seizure control and alertness, results that were similar to the classic ketogenic diet. Gastrointestinal upset was a problem, which led one patient to abandon the diet, but meals were easier to prepare and better accepted by the children.[15] The MCT diet replaced the classic ketogenic diet in many hospitals, though some devised diets that were a combination of the two.[10]
“It all started with Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taubes. I read the book twice, the second time reading many of the referenced articles. Since then, I have recommended low-carb and keto diets with and without intermittent fasting to almost all of my patients who have lifestyle-related chronic conditions. I often suggest that patients start their journey at Diet Doctor. Professionally, the most difficult issue remains dietary modifications for patients in the hospital. As more data is collected I hope we see a change in institutional culture — cheese omelets instead of cornflakes and skim milk for breakfast!”
Children who discontinue the diet after achieving seizure freedom have about a 20% risk of seizures returning. The length of time until recurrence is highly variable, but averages two years. This risk of recurrence compares with 10% for resective surgery (where part of the brain is removed) and 30–50% for anticonvulsant therapy. Of those who have a recurrence, just over half can regain freedom from seizures either with anticonvulsants or by returning to the ketogenic diet. Recurrence is more likely if, despite seizure freedom, an electroencephalogram shows epileptiform spikes, which indicate epileptic activity in the brain but are below the level that will cause a seizure. Recurrence is also likely if an MRI scan shows focal abnormalities (for example, as in children with tuberous sclerosis). Such children may remain on the diet longer than average, and children with tuberous sclerosis who achieve seizure freedom could remain on the ketogenic diet indefinitely.[46]
Eating out while going keto can be tricky. Planning ahead helps you know where your next snacks and meals will come from, so you aren’t tempted to reach for an easy—high-carb—fix, like fast food. Each week, plan out everything from meals to snacks and if you’re using an app, go ahead and fill in your estimated macronutrients ahead of time. This will help you get an idea of your overall intake, so you can make adjustments to reach your daily goals more easily. Get started by planning to make these 10 keto recipes so good you’ll never know you’re on a diet.

Try and aim to keep your protein the same at one gram per pound of body weight and then take in 10-12 grams of carbohydrates for every kilogram of body weight. Start taking these carbohydrates (usually the first bit in liquid form) right after your last workout on Friday night. This is when your body is primed and ready to uptake the carbohydrates and it will be most beneficial for you.
The targeted keto diet follows the basic ketogenic plan until right before a workout. In a traditional ketogenic diet, you focus on proteins and fats in meals. Reducing carbohydrates reduces the energy available from foods. When your body cannot get energy from food sources, it turns to fat stores. It is unclear why this diet helps children with epilepsy, but for those who want to lose weight, the benefit is obvious. You burn off body fat on a ketogenic plan.
The last technique used to determine body composition in the current study was ADP (BodPod; Life Measurements Instruments, Concord, Canada), which is accepted as a convenient alternative to the water immersion method for assessing body composition. The standard BodPod protocol was followed (24), and weekly quality control tests were performed during the study period; a second calibration was conducted immediately prior to the measurement of each participant. ADP determines body volume using Boyle’s law of the pressure/volume relationship. Therefore, body volume is equivalent to the decrease of volume in the chamber with the entrance of the patient under isothermal conditions. The participants were instructed to wear a swimming suit tight to the body and a swim cap during the test to diminish accumulated air and avoid volume discrepancies. Thoracic gas volume was measured by connecting the subject to a breathing circuit. The process was repeated until a consistent measurement was obtained. Body density was calculated as mass divided by volume and corrected for lung volume. The Siri formula was used to calculate FM, FM%, and FFM (24, 25).
“The totality of evidence is very clear: A low-carbohydrate dietary approach is the most effective way to manage the insulin resistance syndrome which is that single biggest driver of obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Diet Doctor has been instrumental in providing extremely useful, clear and educational material to all who want to implement this dietary approach in to their lives. That’s why I recommend the website to all my at-risk patients.”
Diet is the most important lifestyle factor for weight loss. In order to effect significant loss of weight it is necessary to create a consistent caloric deficit. This has the rather obvious side effect of leaving individuals feeling hungry and as though they are in a constant state of deprivation. Dieting is based upon this basic concept, which is the most likely reason why dieting is very likely to fail in the long-term. The ketogenic diet, while controversial and a highly polarizing subject, has demonstrated promise as an alternative dietary strategy for weight management. The KD may hold an advantage over traditional calorie-restricted diets, in that nutritional ketosis may enhance appetite control, and subsequently improve dietary adherence and long-term success. Nevertheless, the KD should be approached with caution, as there are both short- and long-term potential negative side effects. More research into this unique dietary strategy is warranted to fully investigate all potentially positive and negative aspects.
I have ate bacon everyday since starting Keto and have lost 78 pounds in 11 weeks. Most Keto recipes consist of bacon that I see actually. I see so many list of foods to avoid and I certainly find some of them to have some odd foods on them. Packaged sausage is another I have had as a protein and have had no issue. To each their own I guess, some things obviously work differently for others.
“As a physician, I see daily the tremendous impact that our pandemic of chronic nutritional disease is having on people and the health care system, despite our best conventional efforts over the last 40 years. I now focus my time and energy on counseling, supporting and guiding patients on the power of real food as medicine. Using the core principles of low-carb, high-fat eating and intermittent fasting, we see great improvements in diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, polycystic ovary syndrome, NAFLD and many more chronic diseases. Diet Doctor is a great resource for my patients to help them in their journey.”

There is nothing inherently difficult about following a ketogenic diet. We have many patients who do this very easily over many years. The metabolic benefits significantly outway any perceived challenges from limiting particular food types. Uptake would be far more widespread if nutrition professionals left their predujical opinions of SFA’s behind. Finally, given the expertise in Ketogenic Diets at Harvard, Dr David Ludwig, for one springs to mind, I am surprised the author did not avail themselves of the local expertise.
The ketogenic diet is not a benign, holistic, or natural treatment for epilepsy; as with any serious medical therapy, complications may result.[28] These are generally less severe and less frequent than with anticonvulsant medication or surgery.[28] Common but easily treatable short-term side effects include constipation, low-grade acidosis, and hypoglycaemia if an initial fast is undertaken. Raised levels of lipids in the blood affect up to 60% of children[38] and cholesterol levels may increase by around 30%.[28] This can be treated by changes to the fat content of the diet, such as from saturated fats towards polyunsaturated fats, and if persistent, by lowering the ketogenic ratio.[38] Supplements are necessary to counter the dietary deficiency of many micronutrients.[18] 

Hi, I had a gastric bypass 8yrs ago. I’m doing the keto diet with my 16yr old son to help him lose weight and I’ve also put on 20lbs back that I’m trying to get rid off. So far we’ve lost 6lbs in 4weeks. Since I can only eat a little portion at a time and it’s hard to consume the 75% fats to get into a Ketosis stage, although I’m trying really hard but it’s impossible. Can you recommend ways to booster my fat intakes pls. Or other ways to get in to Ketosis. Thank you for all this info you’ve shared by the way.
Despite the efforts to decrease weight loss, obesity prevalence is increasing worldwide [36]. The obesogenic environment and the unsuccessful effect of current treatments are consistently contributing to an increase in obesity prevalence. Obesity is promoted by several factors, including genetic, environmental, metabolic, and behavioral factors [8,11,37]. These same factors are involved in the unsuccessful effect of many weight-loss therapies [38]. Apart from the biochemical and genetic factors, in the literature, obesity has consistently been related with a poorer quality of life [39] and lower self-esteem and lower life satisfaction [40]. Additionally, food addiction was proposed as a plausible causal factor contributing to obesity and weight regain after a weight-loss therapy, at least in the same individuals [41]. Therefore, it is important to control these factors to attain success in weight-loss therapy. In this context, a VLCK diet has previously been shown to induce severe body-weight loss that has been maintained for at least 2 years after dieting [6]. This nutritional weight-loss method resulted in the beneficial effects of decreasing body fat mass by preserving body muscle mass and strength [4] and maintaining the resting metabolic rate [7]. Thus, the new open question was whether the beneficial effects of this nutritional method on body composition and energy metabolism are associated with a modulation in the psychobiological phenomena of obese patients.
Carbohydrate-restricted diets are no more effective than a conventional healthy diet in preventing the onset of type 2 diabetes, but for people with type 2 diabetes they are a viable option for losing weight or helping with glycemic control.[11][12][13] There is little evidence that low-carbohydrate dieting is helpful in managing type 1 diabetes.[1] The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes should adopt a generally healthy diet, rather than a diet focused on carbohydrate or other macronutrients.[13]
In the early 1900s Frederick Madison Allen developed a highly restrictive short term regime which was described by Walter R. Steiner at the 1916 annual convention of the Connecticut State Medical Society as The Starvation Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus.[48]:176–177[49][50][51] People showing very high urine glucose levels were confined to bed and restricted to an unlimited supply of water, coffee, tea, and clear meat broth until their urine was "sugar free"; this took two to four days but sometimes up to eight.[48]:177 After the person's urine was sugar-free food was re-introduced; first only vegetables with less than 5g of carbohydrate per day, eventually adding fruits and grains to build up to 3g of carbohydrate per kilogram of body weight. Then eggs and meat were added, building up to 1g of protein/kg of body weight per day, then fat was added to the point where the person stopped losing weight or a maximum of 40 calories of fat per kilogram per day was reached. The process was halted if sugar appeared in the person's urine.[48]:177–178 This diet was often administered in a hospital in order to better ensure compliance and safety.[48]:179
The original therapeutic diet for paediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories[Note 1] to maintain the correct weight for age and height. The classic therapeutic ketogenic diet was developed for treatment of paediatric epilepsy in the 1920s and was widely used into the next decade, but its popularity waned with the introduction of effective anticonvulsant medications. This classic ketogenic diet contains a 4:1 ratio by weight of fat to combined protein and carbohydrate. This is achieved by excluding high-carbohydrate foods such as starchy fruits and vegetables, bread, pasta, grains, and sugar, while increasing the consumption of foods high in fat such as nuts, cream, and butter.[1] Most dietary fat is made of molecules called long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). However, medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs)—made from fatty acids with shorter carbon chains than LCTs—are more ketogenic. A variant of the classic diet known as the MCT ketogenic diet uses a form of coconut oil, which is rich in MCTs, to provide around half the calories. As less overall fat is needed in this variant of the diet, a greater proportion of carbohydrate and protein can be consumed, allowing a greater variety of food choices.[4][5]
In relation to overall caloric intake, carbohydrates comprise around 55% of the typical American diet, ranging from 200 to 350 g/day. The vast potential of refined carbohydrates to cause harmful effects were relatively neglected until recently. A greater intake of sugar-laden food is associated with a 44% increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome and obesity and a 26% increase in the risk of developing diabetes mellitus. In a 2012 study of all cardiometabolic deaths (heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes) in the United States, an estimated 45.4% were associated with suboptimal intakes of 10 dietary factors. The largest estimated mortality was associated with high sodium intake (9.5%), followed by low intake of nuts and seeds (8.5%), high intake of processed meats (8.2%), low intake of omega-3 fats (7.8%), low intake of vegetables 7.6%), low intake of fruits (7.5%), and high intake of artificially sweetened beverages (7.4%). The lowest estimated mortality was associated with low polyunsaturated fats (2.3%) and unprocessed red meats (0.4%). In addition to this direct harm, excess consumption of low-quality carbohydrates may displace and leave no room in the diet for healthier foods like nuts, unprocessed grains,  fruits, and vegetables.
First, I want to thank you for all of your dedication and work in providing this site. The difficulty of maintaining a healthy weight is a big problem for so many people. My personal question & issue in staying on Keto is my craving for fresh fruit. This a.m I had a large fresh peach along with my “Bullet Proof” coffee. Have I now sabotaged today’s Keto eating?
The most recent keto meal plan to hit the IBIH family is the SCKC or Squeaky Clean Keto Challenge!  Highly effective, but more restrictive than most of my keto meal plans, this SCKC plan contains no dairy, nuts, sweeteners, alcohol, grains, or legumes.  Perfect for people suffering with inflammation, slow losers, or people with a lot of food intolerances, this Squeaky Clean Keto 30 day challenge (with 4 weeks of menu plans) has been taking the internet by storm!
The retention and need for a diuretic in the past may have been from excessive carb/wheat/dairy intake… Something you may find resolves with a ketogenic diet. Decreasing iodized salt and increasing sea salt, especially himilayian pink salt might help you to maintain sodium levels without the fluid retention effects also. For example I always buy unsalted butter and add pink salt for the flavour/sodium component. It’s made a big difference for me (a fellow massive found retainer haha)

Keto runs counter to many of the low-fat diet fads of the 1980s and 1990s: It actually emphasizes fat. “That is hard to comprehend because we don’t eat anything that’s pure fat, says Kristen Mancinelli, RD, author of The Ketogenic Diet. “We don’t eat a stick of butter or a spoonful of olive oil or even a nice cup of lard. That would be unpleasant, so we really have a hard time wrapping our heads around this concept of the ketogenic diet.”
Man I don’t know. The time I lost my body fat down to 5% and got cut was when I did this: I had a protein in the morning with 2% milk, soy protein, a banana or two, depending. I’d go to the community pool and play water vollyball for an hour or so. For lunch I’d have a six inch subway sub, turkey, no cheese, oil and vinegar dressing, standard sub roll, lettuce, onion, hot peppers and sometimes tomato. I’d get the chips but skip the drink except for water. Around five or so I’d do my version of HITT for a half hour of simulated jump rope for three minutes followed by these exercises x 10 each: Push ups, shoulder press, shoulder raise front, shoulder raise lateral, push ups incline, curls, push ups decline, a three prong abs routine of leg lifts and kicks then back to the jump rope and I’d do it for three sets. Anytime I found a place during the week to do pull ups I’d do them. Then around seven I’d have my protein drink again. That was it. I’d allow myself one coffee with no cream or sugar. And I’d drink ice water all night until I went to bed. I got shredded. So I don’t know if it matters really much on what you eat as much as the combinations you do (like meat and starch or sugar is bad) how much you eat, and when you eat. It might be junk science but it worked for me. I wasn’t ever hungry, either. Sometimes when I’d go out with friends to eat lunch at fast food like taco bell I’d get like two cheese enchiladas and three beef tacos and a coke. But it was very rare I did that. Anyway… Good luck to everyone. There are many ways to fitness. Find something you can live with. Peace.
Although fat is the centerpiece of any keto diet, that doesn't mean you should be subsisting on butter-topped steaks, says Kristen Mancinelli, RD, author of The Ketogenic Diet. “A big misconception is that you should just put meat at the center of your plate and add more fat on top,” she says. You also shouldn't be relying on fatty meats to hit your fat quota, she adds.
Getting your macronutrients—fat, protein, carbohydrates—in balance ensures your body has the best sources of energy. “The ketogenic diet for ‘nutritional ketosis’ is 20 percent protein, 5 percent carbs, and 75 percent fat,” says Jake Crandall, a trainer and CEO and founder of Okie Crossfit in Tulsa, OK. “If you go too high in protein, you’re effectively on the Atkins Diet and are low-carb. You’ll achieve weight loss, but not the health benefits of being in ketosis.” But you can still benefit from the 15 best Atkins diet foods for weight loss.
The popular belief that high-fat diets cause obesity and several other diseases such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cancer has not been observed in recent epidemiological studies. Studies carried out in animals that were fed high-fat diets did not show a specific causal relationship between dietary fat and obesity. On the contrary, very-low-carbohydrate and high-fat diets such as the ketogenic diet have shown to beneficial to weight loss.
Implementing the diet can present difficulties for caregivers and the patient due to the time commitment involved in measuring and planning meals. Since any unplanned eating can potentially break the nutritional balance required, some people find the discipline needed to maintain the diet challenging and unpleasant. Some people terminate the diet or switch to a less demanding diet, like the modified Atkins diet or the low-glycaemic index treatment diet, because they find the difficulties too great.[42]
“One of the best meal planning tips I’ve ever received is to structure breakfast and lunch so that you don’t have to think too much about it,” says Emily Bartlett, co-founder of Real Plans. “If you’re OK with repetition, it’s ideal to have a simple selection of recipes for breakfast—including some that can be taken on the go. For lunch, go ahead and use your leftovers with a fresh green salad, and be sure to include a dressing that you really love.” Before you make your keto diet menu, check out the 13 things doctors want you to know about the keto diet.

Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders after stroke,[7] and affects around 50 million people worldwide.[8] It is diagnosed in a person having recurrent, unprovoked seizures. These occur when cortical neurons fire excessively, hypersynchronously, or both, leading to temporary disruption of normal brain function. This might affect, for example, the muscles, the senses, consciousness, or a combination. A seizure can be focal (confined to one part of the brain) or generalised (spread widely throughout the brain and leading to a loss of consciousness). Epilepsy can occur for a variety of reasons; some forms have been classified into epileptic syndromes, most of which begin in childhood. Epilepsy is considered refractory (not yielding to treatment) when two or three anticonvulsant drugs have failed to control it. About 60% of patients achieve control of their epilepsy with the first drug they use, whereas around 30% do not achieve control with drugs. When drugs fail, other options include epilepsy surgery, vagus nerve stimulation, and the ketogenic diet.[7]
Protein: When people first reduce carbohydrates in their diets, it doesn't seem as though the amount of protein they eat is as important to ketosis as it often becomes later on. For example, people on the Atkins diet often eat fairly large amounts of protein in the early stages and remain in ketosis. However, over time, some (perhaps most) people need to be more careful about the amount of protein they eat as (anecdotally) the bodies of many people seem to "get better" at converting protein into glucose (gluconeogenesis). At that point, each individual needs to experiment to see if too much protein is throwing them out of ketosis and adjust as necessary.
Although you'll be cutting way back on carbohydrates and sugar, some fruits are still okay to eat on the keto diet (though you'll still want to be mindful about quantity in order to remain in ketosis). The fruits that make the cut contain far fewer carbs than their off-limits cousins such as apples, pears, bananas, pineapples, papayas, grapes, and fruit juices in general.
Don’t be surprised if you find yourself parched while you’re on the keto diet. Excreting all that extra water will likely cause a spike in thirst—so make it a point to drink up, Mancinelli advises. There’s no hard and fast recommendation for how much water you should be having on a keto diet. But in general, aim to drink enough so your urine is clear or pale yellow. If it’s any darker, bump your intake.

“I am amazed at what a low-carbohydrate diet can do in real life and in my oncology practice. I see many cases of difficult to treat cancers, and know full-well the limitations of conventional chemotherapy. When patients ask about the ketogenic diet and cancer, I point out our recently concluded clinical trial that showed the ketogenic diet to be safe in advanced cancer patients and possibly beneficial in improving quality of life and survival. The diet, together with regular cancer treatment, could be a win-win combination. Diet Doctor is a fabulous website, chock full of information!”
Typically you want to stay away from any brands that use filler ingredients like maltodextrin and dextrose, or high glycemic sweeteners like maltitol. Many low-carb products that claim low net carbs usually use these sugar alcohols. Many candies that are “sugar-free” also use these sweeteners. Avoid them where possible. These specific sweeteners respond in our body in a similar way sugar does.
You work out for a few months and get in shape and fall back to the old habits because you were not conditioned mentally, only physically. Physical fitness is only a part of journey, fitness is over 75% percent mental. Gyms, nutritionists, and personal trainers give most people a temporary Band-Aid but never address the actual issue. The 3-Week Ketogenic Diet includes secret mindset strategies to make your journey so much easier.
While CHO is almost universally regarded as necessary for both health and athletic performance, many studies have called into question the absolute necessity of dietary CHO. As early as 1930 there was evidence demonstrating the efficacy of long-term CHO restriction (14). In an audacious attempt to demonstrate proof-of-concept, arctic explorers Dr. Viljalmur Stefansson and K. Anderson, agreed to participate in a study that involved one year of eating a diet that consisted solely of “meat.” The diet, which consisted of beef, pork, lamb, and chicken, also included significant portions of animal fat, as well as organ meat. This dietary regimen yielded a macronutrient distribution of approximately 81% fat, 18% protein and 1% CHO, over the course of 375 days. The subjects experienced a modest reduction in weight, which occurred during the first week; there were no restrictions on food portions, subjects ate to satisfy appetite. Interestingly, the researchers noted no vitamin deficiencies, no significant change in mental alertness or physical impairment, or any other deficit attributed to eating a high fat, all-meat diet.
Increases in cholesterol levels need discussion too. We do see temporary increases in cholesterol levels often as individuals transition onto a ketogenic diet. However, when you examine lipid particle size (a more important way to look at the cardiovascular risks), the risk pattern doesn’t seem to increase with a ketogenic diet. Harvard Health has written about lipid particle size here before: http://www.health.harvard.edu/womens-health/should-you-seek-advanced-cholesterol-testing-
“I discovered the low-carb lifestyle after struggling myself with my obesity for many years. I was unsuccessful losing weight with the traditional low-fat diet plans that I used to recommend to patients. I researched and reviewed the studies of low-carb/keto eating and I lost weight, becoming a much healthier doctor. I am now passing on that experience onto my patients! When I counsel patients not familiar with low-carb living, I refer them to the Diet Doctor site for testimonials, recipes, and much more.”
If you talk to keto aficionados, you’ll find many save leftovers from dinner for the next day’s lunch. Cook once, eat twice—your keto diet menu for lunch is solved. If you don’t like leftovers or if you’re craving something different for lunch, the mid-day meal can be as simple as a scoop of chicken salad. Or, hit the salad bar at a local grocery store and top a bowl of greens with some good-fat goodies. You can also try one of these simple keto lunches:

If you're new to keto, watch out for hidden carbs. Generally, dairy products and nuts are a good way to meet your daily fat intake, but know that some of those items may contain more carbohydrates than you think. For example, yogurt topped with nuts may seem like a great keto-friendly snack, but a 5.3 ounce serving of plain yogurt has 12 grams of carbohydrates. Vanilla flavored yogurt has 24 grams of carbohydrates. Add an ounce of cashews, weighing in at nearly nine grams of carbs, and you’re up to 21 to 33 grams of carbs for that snack, which could knock you out of ketosis. Be sure to read nutrition labels carefully and pay careful attention to serving sizes. Track foods using a keto-specific app like Senza or KetoDiet can help you stay within your recommended daily carb intake.


A survey in 2005 of 88 paediatric neurologists in the US found that 36% regularly prescribed the diet after three or more drugs had failed, 24% occasionally prescribed the diet as a last resort, 24% had only prescribed the diet in a few rare cases, and 16% had never prescribed the diet. Several possible explanations exist for this gap between evidence and clinical practice.[34] One major factor may be the lack of adequately trained dietitians, who are needed to administer a ketogenic diet programme.[31]
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