The ketogenic diet achieved national media exposure in the US in October 1994, when NBC's Dateline television programme reported the case of Charlie Abrahams, son of Hollywood producer Jim Abrahams. The two-year-old suffered from epilepsy that had remained uncontrolled by mainstream and alternative therapies. Abrahams discovered a reference to the ketogenic diet in an epilepsy guide for parents and brought Charlie to John M. Freeman at Johns Hopkins Hospital, which had continued to offer the therapy. Under the diet, Charlie's epilepsy was rapidly controlled and his developmental progress resumed. This inspired Abrahams to create the Charlie Foundation to promote the diet and fund research.[10] A multicentre prospective study began in 1994, the results were presented to the American Epilepsy Society in 1996 and were published[17] in 1998. There followed an explosion of scientific interest in the diet. In 1997, Abrahams produced a TV movie, ...First Do No Harm, starring Meryl Streep, in which a young boy's intractable epilepsy is successfully treated by the ketogenic diet.[1]
First, a little background: Eric Westman, MD, director of the Duke Lifestyle Medical Clinic, explained to Health in a previous interview that in order to successfully follow the keto diet, you need to eat moderate amounts of protein, reduce your carb intake, and increase fats. When you reduce your carb consumption, your body turns to stored fat as its new fuel source—a process called ketosis. To stay in ketosis, followers of the keto diet must limit their carbs to 50 grams a day, Dr. Westman says.
Dr. Josh Axe, DNM, DC, CNS, is a doctor of natural medicine, clinical nutritionist and author with a passion to help people get well using food as medicine. He’s the author of the books “Eat Dirt: Why Leaky Gut May Be the Root Cause of Your Health Problems,” “Essential Oils: Ancient Medicine” and the upcoming “Keto Diet: Your 30-Day Plan to Lose Weight, Balance Hormones, Boost Brain Health, and Reverse Disease” (February 2019, published by Little, Brown Spark). He’s a co-founder of Ancient Nutrition, a health company where the mission is to restore health, strength and vitality by providing history’s healthiest whole food nutrients to the modern world.
“Our medical practice was featured implementing a low-carbohydrate plan for a patient with type 2 diabetes in the documentary The Magic Pill. We believe food can be used as medicine. Many of our patients with insulin resistance, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, PCOS and more will see excellent results and resolution of chronic disease states with low-carbohydrate diets. Education and understanding as to which dietary strategy is best for the individual is essential in reclaiming one’s health. There is no doubt in my mind that low-carbohydrate planning can be extremely useful and safe for the appropriate clinical scenario.”
So rather than giving one-size-fits-all dietary advice or weaponizing the word “balanced” it might be better if the medical community suggested that there are Individual differences that need to be considered. This might also help those lay folk who have had success with one dietary lifestyle or another also realize that what’s valid for them may not be good advice for others.
Regarding higher-carbohydrate diets, 20 studies reported higher energy expenditure, and this increase in energy expenditure was statistically significant in 14 of those studies. Overall, the evidence suggests that the carbohydrate and fat content of the diet has little impact on energy expenditure. In other words, low-carb diets do not have a significant metabolic advantage like many insulin theory proponents believe.
The ketogenic diet is indicated as an adjunctive (additional) treatment in children and young people with drug-resistant epilepsy.[26][27] It is approved by national clinical guidelines in Scotland,[27] England, and Wales[26] and reimbursed by nearly all US insurance companies.[28] Children with a focal lesion (a single point of brain abnormality causing the epilepsy) who would make suitable candidates for surgery are more likely to become seizure-free with surgery than with the ketogenic diet.[9][29] About a third of epilepsy centres that offer the ketogenic diet also offer a dietary therapy to adults. Some clinicians consider the two less restrictive dietary variants—the low glycaemic index treatment and the modified Atkins diet—to be more appropriate for adolescents and adults.[9] A liquid form of the ketogenic diet is particularly easy to prepare for, and well tolerated by, infants on formula and children who are tube-fed.[5][30]
While you don’t have to be 100% accurate, you can use calorie counting as a starting point. It’s a way to measure how much energy you are actually taking in, and then adjust it to your needs. Obviously, a faster/slower metabolism, activity levels, endocrine problems, etc. will affect the amount of energy you will be expending, and therefore will affect the number of calories you need to take in.
It’s no secret that carbs—especially refined ones like sugary cereals, white bread and pasta, or sweet drinks—cause your blood sugar to spike and dip. So it makes sense that eating less of them can help keep things nice and even. For healthy people, this can translate to more steady energy, less brain fog, and fewer sugary cravings, Mancinelli explains.
Dr. Jockers, thank you so much for this clear and detailed article! I began a keto-style diet around August 2019. By late November, I had fallen from 197 lbs. to under 175 lbs., dropped from 28% to 18% body fat, and anecdotally felt much better in all aspects of my health. All of this occurred exclusively due to diet, I believe– I had almost no exercise routine to speak of, and my desk-based job is pretty sedentary. My family practice doc was surprised and happy with the results as well when I met with him in January… until my blood work came back showing total cholesterol at 257, triglycerides at 236, LDL-C at 162, and HDL at 50.

There are several medical studies — such as two conducted by the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center for the University of Iowa, and the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, for example — that show the ketogenic diet is an effective treatment for cancer and other serious health problems. (12)
As keto grows in popularity, I see more women struggle with it. My anecdotal observation in my medical office and working with people online is that younger men seem to perform best, and better than women of all ages in nutritional ketosis. My female patients, myself included, may have more problems on keto, with their stress hormones (i.e. producing too much cortisol), thyroid function, and may even develop menstrual irregularities. Some women do fine, others may feel worse, suffer from mood issues, and can even gain weight. We are still learning more about why men fare better than women (it may be related to their higher muscle mass). Additionally, there are at least ten genes that may make a person less likely to benefit from keto.
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“I am an anesthesiologist who managed to lose weight and reverse my pre-diabetes a few years back. I now advocate the low-carb diet and lifestyle to all patients, colleagues and friends. Diet Doctor is a comprehensive one-stop resource which I highly recommend. Almost every patient I anesthetize has metabolic issues, and the situation is difficult as the diet in India is primarily carbohydrate based. I have successfully helped friends and patients reverse their type 2 diabetes.”
Getting your macronutrients—fat, protein, carbohydrates—in balance ensures your body has the best sources of energy. “The ketogenic diet for ‘nutritional ketosis’ is 20 percent protein, 5 percent carbs, and 75 percent fat,” says Jake Crandall, a trainer and CEO and founder of Okie Crossfit in Tulsa, OK. “If you go too high in protein, you’re effectively on the Atkins Diet and are low-carb. You’ll achieve weight loss, but not the health benefits of being in ketosis.” But you can still benefit from the 15 best Atkins diet foods for weight loss.
“I have been applying low carb solutions to metabolic problems since the moment I closed the cover of Good Calories, Bad Calories. I share with my low-carb colleagues the wonderful experience of offering effective advice and seeing real results. In addition to metabolic and hormonal problems, I have more recently focused on flexible low-carb approaches for Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative conditions. I greatly enjoy the lively online low-carb community and rely on Diet Doctor as a resource for myself and my patients.”
Given this new meta-analysis, it’s safe to say that low-carb and high-carb diets with protein matched have similar effects on energy expenditure and body fatness. However, this doesn’t mean that the insulin theory of obesity is entirely wrong — these results simply suggest that the theory carries much less significance than calorie intake in general.
“In 2010 I came face-to-face with the compelling, robust evidence for the effectiveness of the low-carb, high-fat diet to prevent and treat serious diseases like diabetes, obesity and heart disease. It contradicted everything I knew as a doctor and scientist about optimal nutrition. I have since aimed to change medical dogma and foster respectful dialogue on evidence-based nutrition, but at a brutal personal and professional cost, even though eventually vindicated. The Noakes Foundation, since 2012, has been promoting unbiased nutritional research into the effects of LCHF on all aspects of human health. The sugar-free train is bound for glory.”

You’ll need to focus on titrating your insulin. Given the low amount of carbs in the Keto diet, I suggest you take detailed notes on how your blood sugar reacts to protein and fats. That way you can determine how much insulin to take with food. As for your basal, if you consistently go high/low without any bolus on board it might be a good idea to revisit your basal rates

The other big factor in deciding to do Keto for 60 days was noticing how I felt doing Trim Healthy Mama (some people call it carb cycling).  When I ate lots of healthy fats, especially in the morning I felt amazing.  My mental focus was amazing and I felt bulletproof.  Often, I would eat an E lunch with carbs and very little fat, which, while perfectly in line with THM guidelines, left me feeling mentally foggy, tired, and lethargic.
Hey Patricia, you definitely want to fill up on fat and make that the majority of your calories. Fat is very satiating so you will probably get fuller, faster compared to when you would eat carbs. However, if you are eating an excessive amount of fat (past your satiety level) than it has to go somewhere and anything in extreme excess will be most likely be stored in your body as body fat. I recommend eating to satiety and if you are not seeing results, you may have to track your consumption for a few weeks so you have a better idea of how much you’re consuming and what works best for your goals. Our macro calculator can help get you started with that if you’d like: https://perfectketo.com/keto-macro-calculator/
Vegan ketogenic diet or vegetarian diet: Yes, both are possible. Instead of animal products, plenty of low-carb, nutrient-dense vegan and/or vegetarian foods are included. Nuts, seeds, low-carb fruits and veggies, leafy greens, healthy fats and fermented foods are all excellent choices on a plant-based keto diet. There’s also a similar plan called ketotarian, which combines keto with vegetarian, vegan and/or pescatarian diets for supposedly greater health benefits.
“A lower-carbohydrate diet and lifestyle has not only changed my personal health for the better, but also the health of my family and my patients. The low-carb ketogenic lifestyle has also transformed my medical practice from a traditional sick-care office to an Integrative Wellness practice that focuses on improving people’s health and preventing illness. I enjoy going into work every day as I now feel I am truly preventing chronic diseases from taking root via proper nutritional counseling. I send virtually all my patients to Diet Doctor for help getting started on their own low-carb journey.”
Articles and information on this website may only be copied, reprinted, or redistributed with written permission (but please ask, we like to give written permission!) The purpose of this Blog is to encourage the free exchange of ideas. The entire contents of this website is based upon the opinions of Dave Asprey, unless otherwise noted. Individual articles are based upon the opinions of the respective authors, who may retain copyright as marked. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the personal research and experience of Dave Asprey and the community. We will attempt to keep all objectionable messages off this site; however, it is impossible to review all messages immediately. All messages expressed on The Bulletproof Forum or the Blog, including comments posted to Blog entries, represent the views of the author exclusively and we are not responsible for the content of any message.
Certain studies suggest that keto diets may “starve” cancer cells. A highly processed, pro-inflammatory, low-nutrient foods can feed cancer cells causing them to proliferate. What’s the connection between high-sugar consumption and cancer? The regular cells found in our bodies are able to use fat for energy, but it’s believed that cancer cells cannot metabolically shift to use fat rather than glucose. (11)
The National Academy of Medicine recommends a minimum intake of 130 g of carbohydrate per day.[23] The FAO and WHO similarly recommend that the majority of dietary energy come from carbohydrates.[24][25] Low-carbohydrate diets are not an option recommended in the 2015-2020 edition of Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which instead recommends a low fat diet.

MCT oil powder is a unique form of dietary fat rapidly absorbed by the body and has a wide range of health benefits. Supplementation with MCT powder can help combat fatigue, suppress appetite[*], enhance thermogenesis (aka ‘fat burning’)[*] and help your body adapt to using ketones for fuel. A recent scientific review showed that MCTs can effectively decrease body weight, total body fat, hip circumference, waist circumference, total subcutaneous fat and visceral fat[*]. Check out this articlefor more information on how to supplement with MCTs.
If you like more veggies in your Keto Diet and are also concerned with a low calorie keto meal plan, then the IBIH 5 Day Keto Soup Diet may be for you!  Featured in Woman’s Day magazine twice already, this Keto Soup Diet is is also Whole 30 friendly, so it’s super healthy and very effective.  Be prepared for some detox symptoms, as this Keto Soup Diet Meal Plan does not include grains, dairy, sweeteners, or alcohol – which means it works very very well, but can cause headaches in the first couple of days.  We have an exclusive Keto Soup Diet Facebook Group for this plan too – so feel free to join to get the support and help you need to succeed and tell everyone about your amazing results!
Although the patients underwent a total of 10 visits, the complete body composition analyses were synchronized with the ketone levels in 4 visits (Table 1; Fig. 1). Visit C-1 was the baseline visit, before starting the diet, with no ketosis (0.0 ± 0.1 mmol/L) and a body weight of 95.9 ± 16.3 kg. Visit C-2 was at the time of maximum level of ketosis (1.0 ± 0.6 mmol/L) with a body weight of 84.2 ± 18.0 kg. At visit C-3 (after 89.7 ± 19.1 days of VLCK), patients began the return to a normal diet and showed a reduction in ketone levels (0.7 ± 0.5 mmol/L) and a body weight of 76.6 ± 11.1 kg. Finally, at visit C-4, the patients were out of ketosis (0.2 ± 0.1 mmol/L) and showed a body weight of 75.1 ± 11.8 kg. All weights were statistically different from baseline levels (P < 0.05; Table 1; Fig. 1).
Experts agree more research needs to be done to determine which keto diet has the potential to preserve muscle and help increase the chances of sustained weight loss. But similar studies suggest the keto version analyzed in this study may hold promise. For example, a randomized study published in December 2014 in the journal Endocrine found that a very-low-calorie ketogenic diet was more effective at sustaining weight loss and preserving lean muscle mass in obese people than a standard low-calorie diet after one year.

Typically you want to stay away from any brands that use filler ingredients like maltodextrin and dextrose, or high glycemic sweeteners like maltitol. Many low-carb products that claim low net carbs usually use these sugar alcohols. Many candies that are “sugar-free” also use these sweeteners. Avoid them where possible. These specific sweeteners respond in our body in a similar way sugar does.


Vegan ketogenic diet or vegetarian diet: Yes, both are possible. Instead of animal products, plenty of low-carb, nutrient-dense vegan and/or vegetarian foods are included. Nuts, seeds, low-carb fruits and veggies, leafy greens, healthy fats and fermented foods are all excellent choices on a plant-based keto diet. There’s also a similar plan called ketotarian, which combines keto with vegetarian, vegan and/or pescatarian diets for supposedly greater health benefits.

The one important caveat: Eating keto also ups the risk for diabetic ketoacidosis, a life-threatening condition where fat gets broken down too fast and causes the blood to become acidic. It’s much more common in people with type 1 diabetes, but if you have type two and are eating keto, talk with your doctor about what you should be doing to diminish your risk.
The inclusion criteria were ages 18 to 65 years, body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m2, stable body weight in the previous 3 months, a desire to lose weight, and a history of failed dietary efforts. The main exclusion criteria were diabetes mellitus, obesity induced by other endocrine disorders or by drugs, and participation in any active weight loss program in the previous 3 months. In addition, those patients with previous bariatric surgery, known or suspected abuse of narcotics or alcohol, severe depression or any other psychiatric disease, severe hepatic insufficiency, any type of renal insufficiency or gout episodes, nephrolithiasis, neoplasia, previous events of cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease, uncontrolled hypertension, orthostatic hypotension, and hydroelectrolytic or electrocardiographic alterations were excluded. Females who were pregnant, breastfeeding, or intending to become pregnant, and those with child-bearing potential who were not using adequate contraceptive methods, were also excluded. Apart from obesity and metabolic syndrome, participants were generally healthy individuals.
In a fantastic online review of the study, Dr. Stephan Guyenet, a nutritional research expert, notes the study's thoroughness and that the results, at face value, support the researchers’ initial hypothesis that a ketogenic diet promoted greater fat loss. Compared with the higher carbohydrate diet, the keto diet coincided with increased energy expenditure, meaning the subjects appeared to burn more calories when their carbohydrate levels were cut, thought they were consuming the same amount of calories as they were on the high carbohydrate diet.
Achieving optimal ketosis hinges on finding the right balance of macronutrients (or “macros” in keto-speak); these are the elements in your diet that account for the majority of your calories, a.k.a. energy—namely, fat, protein, and carbohydrates. By the way, it’s often “net grams” of carbohydrates that are counted toward your daily intake; “net” deducts the amount of fiber in a food from its carbohydrate total.
In steps 4 and 5, the ketogenic phases were ended by the physician in charge of the patient based on the amount of weight lost, and the patient started a low-calorie diet (800 to 1500 kcal/d). At this point, the patients underwent a progressive incorporation of different food groups and participated in a program of alimentary re-education to guarantee long-term maintenance of the weight loss. The maintenance diet consisted of an eating plan that was balanced with respect to carbohydrates, protein, and fat. Depending on the individual, the calories consumed ranged between 1500 and 2000 kcal/d, and the objective was to maintain the weight loss and promote a healthy lifestyle.
Articles and information on this website may only be copied, reprinted, or redistributed with written permission (but please ask, we like to give written permission!) The purpose of this Blog is to encourage the free exchange of ideas. The entire contents of this website is based upon the opinions of Dave Asprey, unless otherwise noted. Individual articles are based upon the opinions of the respective authors, who may retain copyright as marked. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the personal research and experience of Dave Asprey and the community. We will attempt to keep all objectionable messages off this site; however, it is impossible to review all messages immediately. All messages expressed on The Bulletproof Forum or the Blog, including comments posted to Blog entries, represent the views of the author exclusively and we are not responsible for the content of any message.

From baseline to week 16, the mean body weight decreased significantly from 131.4 ± 18.3 kg to 122.7 ± 18.9 kg, BMI decreased from 42.2 ± 5.8 kg/m2 to 39.4 ± 6.0 kg/m2, and waist circumference from 130.0 ± 10.5 cm to 123.3 ± 11.3 cm (Table ​(Table3).3). The percent change in body weight was -6.6%. The mean percent body fat decreased from 40.4 ± 5.8% to 37.0 ± 6.0%. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures did not change significantly over the 16 weeks. The mean heart rate decreased from 81.2 ± 12.9 beats per minute to 74.6 ± 14.0 beats per minute (p = 0.01).

You're using it for a particular, short-term period.The meal substitute diet can function so quick and so well that you might decide to keep on following it for a longer while. You've acquired the flavor and habit of consuming the yummy meal substitute products that you think you'll stick to the program for a vague period. However, you need to understand that enduring high-calorie deficit in your system may not be good on an extended basis. Take advantage of the diet only as a boost to significant weight reduction or to be a procedure for a huge occasion arriving soon or under strict doctors monitoring.
The ESS is based on questions referring to eight such situations, some known to be very soporific and others less so. The questionnaire is self-administered, and the item scores provide a new method for measuring sleep propensity in eight different real-life situations. Subjects are asked to rate on a scale of 0–3 how likely they would be to doze off or fall asleep in the eight situations, based on their usual, current lifestyle. A distinction is made between dozing off and simply feeling tired. If a subject has not been in some of the situations recently, he or she is asked, nonetheless, to estimate how each might affect him or her [29].
High levels of triglycerides in the blood are thought to be a sign of poor metabolism. Poor metabolism, or metabolic disorders, are associated with obesity, diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Often times, elevated triglycerides are a byproduct of insulin resistance. In these cases, a ketogenic diet is an excellent strategy to improve those numbers.

When the craving for alcohol was evaluated, no statistically significant changes were observed in the MACS scores through the nutritional intervention, taking all patients together (Table S1). However, when the analysis was performed considering the gender of participants in the study, men experienced a significant decrease in the total score through the study (p = 0.047). This decrease was more notable in the maximum ketosis phase as compared with baseline (−15.14; p = 0.047). Moreover, a statistically significant reduction was observed in the lack of inhibition item (−27.19; p = 0.042).
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