Pattern B LDL, on the other hand, has a much smaller particle size and is much more prone to oxidation. Another thing about pattern B LDL is that it is small enough to enter into the endothelial lining of the artery where it can become oxidized and more likely to form plaque.  There is a high association between these small dense particles and cardiovascular disease.
(60/60) 17.5 inches 👇 and I lost 23 pounds!!! . Today is a BIG, BIG deal for me. I'm celebrating #60daysketo and I've lost and gained so many things! . What I've lost on #keto : 👉23 pounds 👉2.25 inches on arms 👉3 inches on waist 👉 5.5 inches on pooch 👉3.5 inches on hips 👉1.75 inches on each thigh 👉1.5 inches on each calf . YOU GUYS, I lost 23#, and more than 17.5 inches in only 60 days in #ketosis !!! . Because of having surgery only a couple of weeks into my 60 day goal, I wasn't even able to work out much, and so I'm just now getting back into the swing of #powerlifting again, so almost ALL of this is by diet alone. . I didn't count calories, I only counted my carb and stayed below 40 net carbs every day. . So what comes next? . Well first, new swimsuits. Mine are falling off, and I can see baby abs coming through, so HELLO TWO PIECE! . I am also sticking with keto a bit longer, because @matthewlindow is still on it to lose weight for the military (I'll post his progress pics soon) but after that I'm going to be doing #modifiedketo where I consume about 25 g of carbs 30 minutes before my workout for a couple of months, and the guage if I'm still losing fat and gaining muscle. . My body is an experiment right now, but worst case scenario I'll be unhappy with adding in more carbs and will go back to keto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . #gains #muscle #fitness #fitspo #weightloss #fitnessfriday#cardio #obesetobeast #fitfam #fattofit#noexcuses #flexfriday #flex#weightlossjourney #bodyrecomposition#fitnessmotivation #thickfit #girlswholift#goals #legendary #health #diet#countingcalories #weightlossmotivation#foodisfuel
The findings below have been limited to research specific to the ketogenic diet: the studies listed contain about 70-80% fat, 10-20% protein, and 5-10% carbohydrate. Diets otherwise termed “low carbohydrate” may not include these specific ratios, allowing higher amounts of protein or carbohydrate. Therefore only diets that specified the terms “ketogenic” or “keto,” or followed the macronutrient ratios listed above were included in this list below. In addition, though extensive research exists on the use of the ketogenic diet for other medical conditions, only studies that examined ketogenic diets specific to obesity or overweight were included in this list. (This paragraph was added to provide additional clarity on 5.7.18.)
The ketogenic diet has grown to become extremely popular over the last few years. It’s ideal for those of you that are looking to lose a considerable amount of weight. This diet is essentially a very low carb, high fat diet. While it has many similarities to the Atkins diet when on the keto diet, your body mostly gets its calories from proteins and fat, not from carbohydrates. The video below will give you an idea of what you can expect when moving to a ketosis lifestyle.
There is a lack of evidence of the usefulness of low-carbohydrate dieting for people with type 1 diabetes.[1] Although for certain individuals it may be feasible to follow a low-carbohydrate regime combined with carefully-managed insulin dosing, this is hard to maintain and there are concerns about potential adverse health effects caused by the diet.[1] In general people with type 1 diabetes are advised to follow an individualized eating plan rather than a pre-decided one.[1]

However, this diet is gaining considerable attention as a potential weight-loss strategy due to the low-carb diet craze, which started in the 1970s with the Atkins diet (a very low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet, which was a commercial success and popularized low-carb diets to a new level). Today, other low-carb diets including the Paleo, South Beach, and Dukan diets are all high in protein but moderate in fat. In contrast, the ketogenic diet is distinctive for its exceptionally high-fat content, typically 70% to 80%, though with only a moderate intake of protein.

You work out for a few months and get in shape and fall back to the old habits because you were not conditioned mentally, only physically. Physical fitness is only a part of journey, fitness is over 75% percent mental. Gyms, nutritionists, and personal trainers give most people a temporary Band-Aid but never address the actual issue. The 3-Week Ketogenic Diet includes secret mindset strategies to make your journey so much easier.
The beauty of The 3-Week Ketogenic Diet is that it's completely opposite of the majority of "lose-weight quick" weight loss scams. The 3-Week Ketogenic Diet focuses on FAT LOSS, not weight loss (the difference is explained in the Program Guide). You'll be eating anti-inflammatory foods that promote a healthy, a fast metabolism, and stimulates fat-burning hormones. You'll lose a lot of weight and inches in a short period of time and this time...you'll keep it off.
One thing many people love about keto diet meal plans is that tracking your food is optional. "One of the biggest benefits of the ketogenic diet is that there's no need to meticulously track your calories like you may in other diets," notes Dr. Josh Axe, D.N.M., C.N.S., D.C., founder of DrAxe.com, best-selling author of Eat Dirt, and cofounder of Ancient Nutrition. "Because you're filling up on fat and protein, you're more likely to feel satisfied and energized all day long, which causes you to naturally eat less." This isn't to say that food tracking on keto is discouraged. "Some people may find calorie counting a useful tool to be more mindful and aware of what they're eating, but it's not necessary on the ketogenic diet," says Dr. Axe, but there's no need to get too stressed about hitting a certain caloric goal, especially if you're not trying to lose weight. (Related: The #1 Reason to Stop Counting Calories)
Hey Michael, I would avoid it when just starting off because the carbs can add up fast and mostly of the canned whipped creams are full of additives. Once you’re adapted, I’d recommend making whipped cream from scratch and adding a dash of stevia or other keto-friendly sweetener. It’s super easy and much healthier than the canned versions (also tastes 1000x better!)
It's not the easiest plan to follow, but the theory of ketosis as a possible prevention against disease is gaining attention from cancer specialists. Tumor immunologist Dr. Patrick Hwu, one of the leading cancer specialists in the U.S., has followed the keto diet for four years, although he prefers to call it the fat-burning metabolism diet, or fat-burning diet. More research is needed to prove its benefits, but Hwu, the head of cancer medicine at MD Anderson in Houston, believes in it after seeing improvements in his own health.
A systematic review of 26 short-term intervention trials (varying from 4-12 weeks) evaluated the appetites of overweight and obese individuals on either a very low calorie (~800 calories daily) or ketogenic diet (no calorie restriction but ≤50 gm carbohydrate daily) using a standardized and validated appetite scale. None of the studies compared the two diets with each other; rather, the participants’ appetites were compared at baseline before starting the diet and at the end. Despite losing a significant amount of weight on both diets, participants reported less hunger and a reduced desire to eat compared with baseline measures. The authors noted the lack of increased hunger despite extreme restrictions of both diets, which they theorized were due to changes in appetite hormones such as ghrelin and leptin, ketone bodies, and increased fat and protein intakes. The authors suggested further studies exploring a threshold of ketone levels needed to suppress appetite; in other words, can a higher amount of carbohydrate be eaten with a milder level of ketosis that might still produce a satiating effect? This could allow inclusion of healthful higher carbohydrate foods like whole grains, legumes, and fruit. [9]
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Despite continuous advances in the medical world, obesity continues to remain a major worldwide health hazard with adult mortality as high as 2.8 million per year. The majority of chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease are largely related to obesity which is usually a product of unhealthy lifestyle and poor dietary habits. Appropriately tailored diet regimens for weight reduction can help manage the obesity epidemic to some extent. One diet regimen that has proven to be very effective for rapid weight loss is a very-low-carbohydrate and high-fat ketogenic diet.[1][2][3]


Keep up electrolytes. The major electrolytes in our bodies are sodium, potassium and magnesium. Because a low carb diet (especially a keto diet!) reduces the amount of water you store, this can flush out electrolytes and make you feel sick (called “keto flu”). This is temporary, but you can avoid or eliminate it by salting your food liberally, drinking broth (especially bone broth), and eating pickled vegetables. Some people also choose to take supplements for electrolytes, but it’s best to first consult a doctor that understands and supports keto/low carb lifestyles.
Adding heavy cream or half-and-half to your coffee is one way to get an additional source of fat into your day, says Keatley. Just realize that it is a source of saturated fat — and, given the small serving size, it’s easy to go overboard. According to the USDA, 1 tbsp has 51 calories, 5 g of fat (3.5 g saturated fat), and is just shy of ½ g of carbohydrate.
“I prescribe and monitor low-carbohydrate diets because they are evidence-based and actionable. Diet Doctor provides great resources for my patients, most of whom present with joint and tendon problems, related to excess mechanical load (overweight) and inflammation. I am fortunate to have the opportunity to change their lifestyle at a time when deterioration in health is early and minimal. As one of my patients with diabetes remarked, “At least the turning point is happening because of my sore knee and not a stroke or a heart attack.” I couldn’t have summed up the rewarding nature of this work any better.”
A cyclic ketogenic diet (or carb-cycling) is a low-carbohydrate diet with intermittent periods of high or moderate carbohydrate consumption. This is a form of the general ketogenic diet that is used as a way to maximize fat loss while maintaining the ability to perform high-intensity exercise. A ketogenic diet limits the number of grams of carbohydrate the dieter may eat, which may be anywhere between 0 and 50g per day. The remainder of the caloric intake must come primarily from fat sources and protein sources in order to maintain ketosis (the condition in which the body burns fats and uses ketones instead of glucose for fuel).
What makes this diet so special is that it changes how your body feels and most importantly how your body uses energy, placing you into a state known as ketosis. This is actually where all the magic begins to happen; in this state your body starts to utilize substances known as ketone bodies which are produced by the breakdown of your body fats. Your body loves glucose and if it has that on hand it’s going to use that first for energy. On the keto diet, the amount of carbohydrates decreases drastically, which in turn will lead to less production of glucose. High levels of glucose production is generally what makes you fat; without it, the body will begin to start breaking down your body fat and this is when you start to get leaner.
My point here is that the warnings about the ketogenic principles are well taken and well documented. My concern is implications that this is a fad. I don’t use the word diet with my patients and I’m concerned that the principles behind the label and the real results that these readers have commented on might get minimized. I have found it best to encourage patients to read authors like: Stephen Phinney, Jeff Volek, Patricia Daly, and Charles Gant and the be partners with their doctors and check blood work as they move along. I am not for or against the article. If ketogenic principles offer people enduring, satisfying, and cohesive change then why not read about its potential and flexilbity?

“I first began recommending a low-carbohydrate approach to diet and lifestyle in 2017 after discovering personal success with this way of eating. Since then, I’ve helped many patients adopt a LCHF diet and seen substantial clinical improvements — particularly with insulin resistance and diabetes — with this approach. Eating whole, nutritious food is good for everyone and results in the remission of disease and restoration of both physical and mental health.”
“Real food — that is low-sugar, high-fiber — works for most of the population, but some patients may need a low-carb diet for best results. For those patients, I am totally for low carb. I have certainly had many insulin-resistant patients who didn’t get better until they went on a low-carb diet. I am not remotely concerned about negative effects of low carb. I feel that, aside from patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and type 5 hyperlipidemia, a low-carb diet is entirely safe.”
Health experts think that the first law is relevant to why we get fat because they say to themselves and then to us, as the The New York Times did, “Those who consume more calories than they expend in energy will gain weight.” This is true. It has to be. To get fatter and heavier, we have to overeat. We have to consume more calories than we expend. That’s a given. But thermodynamics tells us nothing about why this happens, why we consume more calories than we expend. It only says that if we do, we will get heavier, and if we get heavier, then we did.
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