Typically you want to stay away from any brands that use filler ingredients like maltodextrin and dextrose, or high glycemic sweeteners like maltitol. Many low-carb products that claim low net carbs usually use these sugar alcohols. Many candies that are “sugar-free” also use these sweeteners. Avoid them where possible. These specific sweeteners respond in our body in a similar way sugar does.
Urine ketone data were missing in a median of 4 participants (range 0–8) at any given visit. The proportion of participants with a urine ketone reading greater than trace was 1 of 17 participants at baseline, 5 of 17 participants at week 2, and similar frequencies at subsequent visits until week 14 when 2 of 18 participants had readings greater than trace and week 16 when 2 of 21 participants had readings greater than trace. During the study, only 27 of 151 urine ketone measurements were greater than trace, with one participant accounting for all 7 occurrences of the highest urine ketone reading (large160).
Providing additional support Paoli et al. (17) examined the effect of a modified KD diet (~55% fat, 41% protein, and 4.5% CHO) on performance and body composition in gymnasts. In a crossover design, researchers compared independent 30-day dietary regimens consisting of “normal diet” (WD; 46.8% CHO, 38.5% fat, and 14.7% protein) and modified KD in nine elite male gymnasts. There were no significant changes from pre to post during either dietary intervention for measures of physical performance, indicating the absence of significant dietary CHO did not negatively impact physical ability. The post-KD measurements, however, saw a significant decrease in fat mass (pre: 5.3; post:
There is a lack of evidence of the usefulness of low-carbohydrate dieting for people with type 1 diabetes.[1] Although for certain individuals it may be feasible to follow a low-carbohydrate regime combined with carefully-managed insulin dosing, this is hard to maintain and there are concerns about potential adverse health effects caused by the diet.[1] In general people with type 1 diabetes are advised to follow an individualized eating plan rather than a pre-decided one.[1]
The retention and need for a diuretic in the past may have been from excessive carb/wheat/dairy intake… Something you may find resolves with a ketogenic diet. Decreasing iodized salt and increasing sea salt, especially himilayian pink salt might help you to maintain sodium levels without the fluid retention effects also. For example I always buy unsalted butter and add pink salt for the flavour/sodium component. It’s made a big difference for me (a fellow massive found retainer haha)
Overweight individuals with metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes are likely to see improvements in the clinical markers of disease risk with a well-formulated very-low-carbohydrate diet. Glucose control improves due to less glucose introduction and improved insulin sensitivity. In addition to reducing weight, especially truncal obesity and insulin resistance, low-carb diets also may help improve blood pressure, blood glucose regulation, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol levels. However, LDL cholesterol may increase on this diet.
“As a physician I was frustrated and distressed by patients’ worsening health and by the spiraling health care costs caused by diabetes, obesity and other chronic conditions, all linked to the food we eat. We help our patients improve their health and optimize their weight with prescribed lifestyle modification, teaching them the link between unhealthy, refined and processed foods and chronic illness. Our growing database of patients who have lost weight and improved cardio-metabolic markers demonstrates the benefits of low-carbohydrate, whole-food diets. In short, reducing the carbohydrate content of our meals controls hunger, promotes weight loss, and improves health.”

Thyroid health and longevity. Along with balancing sex hormones, a ketogenic lifestyle has a positive effect on thyroid hormones as well. A very low-carb diet tends to drive down T3, the main active thyroid hormone. Higher T3 levels make your cells use more energy (hyperthyroidism), which can increase free-radical production. Many scientists believe that lower levels of T3 actually increase lifespan by conserving energy and decreasing free-radical production. A ketogenic lifestyle is positively correlated with improved thyroid health and overall longevity [15].


In summary, the LCKD had positive effects on body weight, waist measurement, serum triglycerides, and glycemic control in a cohort of 21 participants with type 2 diabetes. Most impressive is that improvement in hemoglobin A1c was observed despite a small sample size and short duration of follow-up, and this improvement in glycemic control occurred while diabetes medications were reduced substantially in many participants. Future research must further examine the optimal medication adjustments, particularly for diabetes and diuretic agents, in order to avoid possible complications of hypoglycemia and dehydration. Because the LCKD can be very effective at lowering blood glucose, patients on diabetes medication who use this diet should be under close medical supervision or capable of adjusting their medication.


The ketogenic diet is used to treat drug-resistant childhood epilepsy. It has become a fad diet for people attempting to lose weight.[39] Dieters trying this often do not achieve true ketosis as this requires extreme carbohydrate restriction, and maintaining a ketogenic diet is difficult.[39][11] Some diet advocates make misleading claims that the ketogenic diet can treat or prevent cancer.[14]
Long-term compliance is low and can be a big issue with a ketogenic diet, but this is the case with any lifestyle change.  Even though the ketogenic diet is significantly superior in the induction of weight loss in otherwise healthy patients with obesity and the induced weight loss is rapid, intense, and sustained until at least 2 year, the understanding of the clinical impacts, safety, tolerability, efficacy, duration of treatment, and prognosis after discontinuation of the diet is challenging and requires further studies to understand the disease-specific mechanisms.
“I started a low-carb, high-fat diet for myself in an attempt to treat my own health problems. Since then, I have seen significant health benefits not only in myself but also in many of my patients using a LCHF/ketogenic approach. Diet Doctor gives a simple but very effective evidence-based resource that I confidently recommend to all my patients. And the recipes are great!”
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A ketogenic diet also has been shown to improve blood sugar control for patients with type 2 diabetes, at least in the short term. There is even more controversy when we consider the effect on cholesterol levels. A few studies show some patients have increase in cholesterol levels in the beginning, only to see cholesterol fall a few months later. However, there is no long-term research analyzing its effects over time on diabetes and high cholesterol.
“The totality of evidence is very clear: A low-carbohydrate dietary approach is the most effective way to manage the insulin resistance syndrome which is that single biggest driver of obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Diet Doctor has been instrumental in providing extremely useful, clear and educational material to all who want to implement this dietary approach in to their lives. That’s why I recommend the website to all my at-risk patients.”

There are three instances where there’s research to back up a ketogenic diet, including to help control type 2 diabetes, as part of epilepsy treatment, or for weight loss, says Mattinson. “In terms of diabetes, there is some promising research showing that the ketogenic diet may improve glycemic control. It may cause a reduction in A1C — a key test for diabetes that measures a person’s average blood sugar control over two to three months — something that may help you reduce medication use,” she says.


Oatmeal is something we all miss when it starts to get cold outside, but it is filled with carbs. You can easily make your own oatmeal by following one of the many recipes online. Or, if you’d like a different twist on oatmeal, give our Cinnamon Roll Oatmeal a try. Using what you might think are strange ingredients (cue cauliflower), you get an absolutely delicious faux oatmeal.


Letting your blood sugar drop too low when following low-calorie diets -- often containing 1,000 to 1,200 calories daily for women and 1,200 to 1,600 calories a day for men -- can lead to headaches. Low blood sugar, which happens when too little glucose is in your bloodstream, can occur if you skip meals to reach your weight-loss calorie allotment. To help prevent headaches during weight loss, eat regular meals and snacks every few hours or so.
Eating a keto diet can have some short-term health perks. But in the long run, it also has the potential to create some serious health problems. That’s why many experts say you shouldn’t attempt it on your own. “In general, if a person follows a ketogenic diet, they should only do so for a brief time and under close medical supervision,” says Hultin.
^ Schwingshackl L, Chaimani A, Schwedhelm C, Toledo E, Pünsch M, Hoffmann G, et al. (2018). "Comparative effects of different dietary approaches on blood pressure in hypertensive and pre-hypertensive patients: A systematic review and network meta-analysis". Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr (Systematic Review): 1–14. doi:10.1080/10408398.2018.1463967. PMID 29718689.
Most recently, Wilson et al. (27) investigated the effect of a 10-week KD on strength, body composition, blood lipids and hormonal response in resistance trained males, while following a periodized resistance training program. The investigation included a 2-week dietary adaptation period, and a control group, which followed a more traditional macronutrient ratio consisting of 55% CHO, 25% fat and 20% protein (WD). The 10-week dietary intervention was followed by a 1-week CHO re-introduction for the KD group. Average caloric consumption across the 11-week intervention was similar between groups. Blood lipids remained constant and were not significantly different between groups. The KD group did, however, elicit a significant increase in blood triglycerides during week 11, with the re-introduction of CHO. Total testosterone was significantly increased in the KD group, compared to WD, however, free testosterone was not significantly different between groups. While both groups saw increases in lean body mass, the KD group realized gains significantly greater than the WD group. Similarly, the KD group experienced significantly greater decreases in fat mass during the 10-week CHO restriction period. There were no significant differences in measures of strength or power between groups. From this, the authors concluded that the KD favorably impacted body composition, with no negative impact on blood lipids or muscular strength and power.

The ADA say low-carbohydrate diets can be useful to help people with type 2 diabetes lose weight, but that these diets were poorly defined, difficult to sustain, unsuitable for certain groups of people and that, for diet composition in general, "no single approach has been proven to be consistently superior".[13] Overall, the ADA recommend people with diabetes should be "developing healthy eating patterns rather than focusing on individual macronutrients, micronutrients, or single foods". They recommended that the carbohydrate in a diet should come from "vegetables, legumes, fruits, dairy (milk and yogurt), and whole grains"; highly-refined foods and sugary drinks should be avoided.[13]
^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Seckold R, Fisher E, de Bock M, King BR, Smart CE (October 2018). "The ups and downs of low-carbohydrate diets in the management of Type 1 diabetes: a review of clinical outcomes". Diabet. Med. (Review). doi:10.1111/dme.13845. PMID 30362180. Low‐carbohydrate diets are of interest for improving glycaemic outcomes in the management of Type 1 diabetes. There is limited evidence to support their routine use in the management of Type 1 diabetes.
“I discovered the low-carb, ketogenic diet some four years ago and saw huge improvements in my own health. After establishing that it is based on sound scientific principles I felt compelled to offer it to my patients. We recommend the Diet Doctor website as it offers an unbiased, contemporary source of reliable low-carb ketogenic advice. It is easy to use and you can rely on its integrity.”
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