“I started a low-carb, high-fat diet for myself in an attempt to treat my own health problems. Since then, I have seen significant health benefits not only in myself but also in many of my patients using a LCHF/ketogenic approach. Diet Doctor gives a simple but very effective evidence-based resource that I confidently recommend to all my patients. And the recipes are great!”
Metabolic flexibility: The ketogenic diet is not metabolically flexible. On the diet, your body adapts to using fats for fuel, which, in turn, means it is no longer adapted to using carbs efficiently. People have the tendency to follow the diet strictly for a few months, get the results they want, and then switch right back to a carb-happy diet.  If you introduce a lot of carbs when your body isn’t adjusted to handling them, you may gain back all of the fat you lost, if not more. It's often the case that many people gain fat after reintroducing carbs because their calories inadvertently go up or they get nutrient timing wrong. When transitioning out of keto, re-introduce carbs carefully to ensure your suffering wasn’t all for nought.
“After struggling with weight my entire life, I was pointed in the direction of a low-carb diet by a group of other physicians — and it changed my life. As a family physician, it became clear to me how many of my patients could benefit from this lifestyle in so many ways. I spent time training with other doctors who had been practicing nutritional medicine with their patients for years, and learned how best to help my own patients. This is my passion, and being able to help change patients lives in this way is incredibly rewarding.”

Tallon, these suggestions are meant to be taken one at a time. If you’ve hit a plateau or are struggling with weight loss, you can try to cut back on your protein. If that doesn’t provide results than maybe that wasn’t the culprit..now try cutting back on dairy, see what happens with that. It’s all about finding what works for you. If you cut out everything at once, you’ll never know which one was causing the issue. Hope that makes sense.


“As a family physician in the most obese state in the USA, I see the devastation of type 2 diabetes and metabolic disease in almost every hospital patient I see. For six years, I have been using education and a low-carb lifestyle to help these patients get healthier, reduce meds, gain energy, and lose belly fat. They learn that this is a sustainable life plan filled with joy and good food. Every day I share the amazing resource of Diet Doctor in my practice. Together as a global community we can put these conditions in remission and prevent them all together.”
Although the KD has shown promise as an alternative dietary strategy for weight management, it should be approached with caution. Acutely, the KD causes physiological changes which may manifest as the “keto flu,” a set of symptoms which commonly includes headache, nausea, gastrointestinal upset and fatigue. A recent study by Urbain et al. (22) illustrates this point, as they state, “Consistent with other studies, our subjects complained about headache, gastrointestinal symptoms, and general weakness mainly during the 1-week metabolic adaptation phase to a KD.” While these symptoms typically resolve within the first one to two weeks, this may present an unpleasant barrier for many individuals to overcome.
Much of the research into low-carbohydrate dieting has been of poor quality and studies which reported large effects have garnered disproportionate attention in comparison to those which are methodologically sound.[5] Higher quality studies tend to find no meaningful difference in outcome between low-fat and low-carbohydrate dieting.[5] Low-quality meta-analyses have tended to report favourably on the effect of low-carbohydrate diets: a systematic review found that 9 out of 10 meta-analyses with positive conclusions were affected by publication bias.[5]
Since dehydration is a contributor to headaches, drink plenty of water when following a low-calorie, weight-loss diet -- especially if you exercise regularly. Drinking water, especially before meals, also helps fill you up and makes it easier to stick with a lower daily calorie allotment. The Institute of Medicine reports that adequate intake levels are about 16 cups of water daily for men and 11 cups a day for women. These amounts include water in other beverages and foods. The University of Rochester Medical Center reports that about 80 percent of your water intake comes from water and beverages, and 20 percent generally comes from food.
Kristin Parker is an American temporarily living in South Korea. Her role with Team Diet Doctor is customer service. If you have a question or a comment on our social media platforms, website or our Facebook group, she will likely be the one to answer you back! Kristin cooks for a family of four, including two hungry teenage sons. Her keto meal plan yields generous servings of substantial, hearty meals that they all like.
Hi Sylvie, thanks for the positive review! To answer your question about spaghetti squash – it could quite frankly go either way. It has about 7g total carbs per serving (1 cup) and 5.5 net carbs which could be considered a bit high for keto but still on the moderate/low range compared to all the other starchy veggies out there. I would just be mindful of this and consume in moderation 🙂
Measuring blood ketones is the most reliable method. There is a home blood test you can use, but the strips can be very expensive. An alternative is to measure ketones in the urine with a dipstick test, which is much more accessible and inexpensive. However, this method is much less reliable and as time goes on and the body adapts to ketosis, it becomes even less reliable.

The ketogenic diet is a mainstream dietary therapy that was developed to reproduce the success and remove the limitations of the non-mainstream use of fasting to treat epilepsy.[Note 2] Although popular in the 1920s and '30s, it was largely abandoned in favour of new anticonvulsant drugs.[1] Most individuals with epilepsy can successfully control their seizures with medication. However, 20–30% fail to achieve such control despite trying a number of different drugs.[9] For this group, and for children in particular, the diet has once again found a role in epilepsy management.[1][10]
Katherine Arvesen, RDN, who in private practice in Plano, Texas, also notes that the study was not randomized and controlled, which is the gold standard for medical research to minimize error and bias. In this study, the patients were their own controls, meaning their results were compared with their own baseline (starting) measurements, not with the results of a control group.
“As a psychiatrist who practices traditional and holistic (integrative) psychiatry, I find my patients are always looking for non-pharmacological ways to improve both their psychological and physical health. Diet Doctor has proven to be an excellent and reliable resource to help my patients develop and maintain healthy lifestyle choices with low-carb and ketogenic diets. My patients are thrilled with the extensive variety of recipe options that are easy to prepare as well as the informative videos on relevant health issues. I am equally thrilled with the positive benefits in my patients’ mood, anxiety, and cognitive clarity.”
Stock up: Jet.com's new City Grocery service (available in select markets) makes it easy to ensure you always have keto-friendly veggies in the fridge. We love their delivery scheduling tool; simply fill your cart, then decide which day and timeframe you'd like your groceries delivered. One of our faves: Urban Roots Green Squash Veggie Noodles are great for whipping up low-carb "pasta" dishes.
The last technique used to determine body composition in the current study was ADP (BodPod; Life Measurements Instruments, Concord, Canada), which is accepted as a convenient alternative to the water immersion method for assessing body composition. The standard BodPod protocol was followed (24), and weekly quality control tests were performed during the study period; a second calibration was conducted immediately prior to the measurement of each participant. ADP determines body volume using Boyle’s law of the pressure/volume relationship. Therefore, body volume is equivalent to the decrease of volume in the chamber with the entrance of the patient under isothermal conditions. The participants were instructed to wear a swimming suit tight to the body and a swim cap during the test to diminish accumulated air and avoid volume discrepancies. Thoracic gas volume was measured by connecting the subject to a breathing circuit. The process was repeated until a consistent measurement was obtained. Body density was calculated as mass divided by volume and corrected for lung volume. The Siri formula was used to calculate FM, FM%, and FFM (24, 25).
Having tempting, unhealthy foods in your home is one of the biggest reasons for failure when starting any diet. To maximize your chances of success with the keto diet, you need to remove as many triggers as you can. This crucial step will help prevent moments of weakness from ruining all your hard work.If you aren’t living alone, make sure to discuss with your family or housemates before throwing anything out. If some items are simply not yours to throw out, try to compromise and agree on a special location so you can keep them out of sight.
People suffering from diabetes and taking insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents suffer severe hypoglycemia if the medications are not appropriately adjusted before initiating this diet. The ketogenic diet is contraindicated in patients with pancreatitis, liver failure, disorders of fat metabolism, primary carnitine deficiency, carnitine palmitoyltransferase deficiency, carnitine translocase deficiency, porphyrias, or pyruvate kinase deficiency. People on a ketogenic diet rarely can have a false positive breath alcohol test. Due to ketonemia, acetone in the body can sometimes be reduced to isopropanol by hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase which can give a false positive alcohol breath test result. 
Klein S, Sheard NF, Pi-Sunyer S, Daly A, Wylie-Rosett J, Kulkarni K, Clark NG. Weight management through lifestyle modification for the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes: rationale and strategies. A statement of the American Diabetes Association, the North American Association for the Study of Obesity, and the American Society for Clinical Nutrition. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;80:257–263. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

You can still get a super crisp crust on chicken while keeping it moist and juicy on the inside. There are a few ways to do this, but the best method we’ve found is by grinding up pork rinds in the food processor and adding parmesan cheese to the mix. This will result in a fantastic crust all the way around your chicken, giving you the perfect keto fried chicken.


This style of Ketogenic Diet, the temporary reduction in fats, carbohydrates and sugars is the heart of the Ideal Protein Protocol. Ideal Protein a medically developed, step-by-step, personalized Ketogenic Weight Loss Diet available today. By temporarily restricting fat intake, the Ideal Protein dieter burns through fat stores more rapidly, resulting in safe, efficient weight loss. Because the Ideal Protein Protocol is a Keto Diet focused on weight loss and weight maintenance, for most people it will be the safest and most credible entry point into living a low carbohydrate lifestyle. Not only is the Ideal Protein Protocol a supervised Ketogenic weight loss program, we teach our dieters how to develop and maintain a healthier relationship with food after they have graduated from Ketosis. This makes maintaining your new healthier weight easier and safer following your weight loss, because living in a state of Ketosis should only be temporary.

In the 1990s, Atkins published an update from his 1972 book, Dr. Atkins New Diet Revolution, and other doctors began to publish books based on the same principles. This has been said to be the beginning of what the mass media call the "low carb craze" in the United States.[59] During the late 1990s and early 2000s, low-carbohydrate diets became some of the most popular diets in the US. By some accounts, up to 18% of the population was using one type of low-carbohydrate diet or another at the peak of their popularity.[60] Food manufacturers and restaurant chains like Krispy Kreme noted the trend, as it affected their businesses.[61] Parts of the mainstream medical community have denounced low-carbohydrate diets as being dangerous to health, such as the AHA in 2001[62] and the American Kidney Fund in 2002[63] Low-carbohydrate advocates did some adjustments of their own, increasingly advocating controlling fat and eliminating trans fat.[64]
The average person's diet contain about 55% carbohydrates, 30% fat, and 15% protein. On the keto diet, you eat a whole lot more fat, and a lot less carbs: 80% of the diet is comprised of fat, 15% is protein, and a mere 5% of calories come from carbohydrates. For someone on a 1,500-calorie diet, that translates to 19 grams of carbohydrates per day, which is less than what you find in one medium-sized apple.
The weight-loss program has five steps and adheres to the most recent guidelines of the 2015 EFSA on total carbohydrate intake [22]. The first three steps consist of a VLCK diet (600–800 kcal/day), low in carbohydrates (<50 g daily from vegetables), and lipids (only 10 g of olive oil per day). The amount of high biological-value proteins ranged between 0.8 and 1.2 g per each kg of ideal body weight to ensure that patients were meeting their minimum body requirements and to prevent the loss of lean mass. In step 1, the patients ate high-biological-value protein preparations five times a day and vegetables with low glycemic indexes. In step 2, one of the protein servings was substituted with a natural protein (e.g., meat or fish) either at lunch or at dinner. In step 3, a second serving of low-fat natural protein was substituted for the second serving of biological protein preparation. Throughout these ketogenic phases, supplements of vitamins and minerals, such as K, Na, Mg, Ca, and omega-3 fatty acids, were provided in accordance with international recommendations [23]. These three steps were maintained until the patient lost the target amount of weight, ideally 80%. Hence, the ketogenic steps were variable in time depending on the individual and the weight-loss target. The total ketosis state lasted for 60–90 days only. 

In spite of the scientific evidence and real-life testimonials, not everyone is recommended to go on the ketosis diet. This highly specialized, extremely meticulous diet plan is suited to a particular dieter profile, and may also be harmful to some without the guidance of a doctor. But if performed correctly, the very low-calorie diet may be the only way for you to experience considerable, life-changing weight reduction.
The ketogenic diet is a medical nutrition therapy that involves participants from various disciplines. Team members include a registered paediatric dietitian who coordinates the diet programme; a paediatric neurologist who is experienced in offering the ketogenic diet; and a registered nurse who is familiar with childhood epilepsy. Additional help may come from a medical social worker who works with the family and a pharmacist who can advise on the carbohydrate content of medicines. Lastly, the parents and other caregivers must be educated in many aspects of the diet for it to be safely implemented.[5]
Eating out while going keto can be tricky. Planning ahead helps you know where your next snacks and meals will come from, so you aren’t tempted to reach for an easy—high-carb—fix, like fast food. Each week, plan out everything from meals to snacks and if you’re using an app, go ahead and fill in your estimated macronutrients ahead of time. This will help you get an idea of your overall intake, so you can make adjustments to reach your daily goals more easily. Get started by planning to make these 10 keto recipes so good you’ll never know you’re on a diet. 

Most recently, Wilson et al. (27) investigated the effect of a 10-week KD on strength, body composition, blood lipids and hormonal response in resistance trained males, while following a periodized resistance training program. The investigation included a 2-week dietary adaptation period, and a control group, which followed a more traditional macronutrient ratio consisting of 55% CHO, 25% fat and 20% protein (WD). The 10-week dietary intervention was followed by a 1-week CHO re-introduction for the KD group. Average caloric consumption across the 11-week intervention was similar between groups. Blood lipids remained constant and were not significantly different between groups. The KD group did, however, elicit a significant increase in blood triglycerides during week 11, with the re-introduction of CHO. Total testosterone was significantly increased in the KD group, compared to WD, however, free testosterone was not significantly different between groups. While both groups saw increases in lean body mass, the KD group realized gains significantly greater than the WD group. Similarly, the KD group experienced significantly greater decreases in fat mass during the 10-week CHO restriction period. There were no significant differences in measures of strength or power between groups. From this, the authors concluded that the KD favorably impacted body composition, with no negative impact on blood lipids or muscular strength and power.
When we constantly consume sugar, we release dopamine in our brain – creating an addiction and an increased tolerance. Over time you will have to eat larger and larger amounts of sugar to continue the dopamine secretion. Once our body is dependent on a chemical reaction in the brain, we can find that we’re craving things even when we’re not hungry.
What is the condition you developed from dieting years ago? And how did you find out what it was? I used diet pills years ago but have stopped using them about 3 years ago. Now I’m finding it extremely hard to lose weight and fear I’ll have to eat hardly any calories (1000 or less which seems like nothing on Keto) to finally lose weight. I’m just curious how you found out about yours.
“I have an interest in diabetes and preventative medicine and have started recommending intermittent fasting in combination with a low-carb, high-fat diet to all of my patients both for treatment and reversal of diabetes and general good health and prevention. I recommend the Diet Doctor website to all of my patients so they can find the best information from knowledgeable experts regarding living a low-carb lifestyle, from educational videos to amazing recipes and everything in between.”
7. Gomez-Arbelaez D., Crujeiras A.B., Castro A.I., Martinez-Olmos M.A., Canton A., Ordonez-Mayan L., Sajoux I., Galban C., Bellido D., Casanueva F.F. Resting metabolic rate of obese patients under very low calorie ketogenic diet. Nutr. Metab. (Lond.) 2018;15:18. doi: 10.1186/s12986-018-0249-z. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]

A lot of people take their macros as a “set in stone” type of thing. You shouldn’t worry about hitting the mark every single day to the dot. If you’re a few calories over some days, a few calories under on others – it’s fine. Everything will even itself out in the end. It’s all about a long term plan that can work for you, and not the other way around.


But there is evidence that low-carb diets may increase metabolism, according to a paper published November 14 in BMJ. Researchers found that overweight adults who lowered carbohydrates and added more fat into their diets burned about 250 calories more each day than people on high-carb, low-fat diets. The study is impressive because it's the largest, most expensive, and controlled study of its kind.

Ariel Warren is a Registered Dietitian, Diabetes Educator, graduate from Brigham Young, and was diagnosed with Type 1 at the age of 4 years old. Ariel understands diabetes and enjoys working with clients to improve their blood sugar management, healthy eating, weight loss, fitness, and pregnancy. For coaching from a T1D Dietitian, you can contact Ariel directly, through her website: arielwarren.com.
The ketogenic diet is a medical nutrition therapy that involves participants from various disciplines. Team members include a registered paediatric dietitian who coordinates the diet programme; a paediatric neurologist who is experienced in offering the ketogenic diet; and a registered nurse who is familiar with childhood epilepsy. Additional help may come from a medical social worker who works with the family and a pharmacist who can advise on the carbohydrate content of medicines. Lastly, the parents and other caregivers must be educated in many aspects of the diet for it to be safely implemented.[5]
The weight loss program has 5 steps (Supplemental Fig. 1) and adheres to the most recent (2015) European Food Safety Authority guidelines on total carbohydrate intake (17). The first 3 steps consist of a VLCK diet (600 to 800 kcal/d), which is low in carbohydrates [< 50 g (26 to 30 g) per day from vegetables] and lipids (only 10 g of olive oil per day). The amount of high-biological-value proteins range from 0.8 to 1.2 g per kg of ideal body weight to ensure minimal body requirements are met and to prevent the loss of lean mass. In step 1, the patients consumed high-biological-value protein preparations 5 times per day, and vegetables with low glycemic indexes. In step 2, 1 of the protein servings was replaced by a natural protein (e.g., meat or fish) either at lunch or at dinner. In step 3, a second serving of low-fat natural protein replaced the second serving of biological protein. Throughout the ketogenic phases, supplements of vitamins and minerals, such as K, Na, Mg, Ca, and omega-3 fatty acids, were provided in accordance with international recommendations (18). These first 3 steps were maintained until the patient lost the target amount of weight, ideally 80%. Hence, the ketogenic steps were variable in time, depending on the individual and the weight loss target.

RESULTS: After VLCKD1 were reduced: Body Mass Index (BMI) (Δ%=-11.1%, p=0.00), Total Body Water (TBW) (p<0.05); Android Fat Percentage (AFP) (Δ%=-1.8%, p=0.02); Android Fat Mass (AFM) (Δ%=-12.7%, p=0.00); Gynoid Fat Mass (GFM) (Δ%=-6.3%, p=0.01); Intermuscular Adipose Tissue (IMAT) (Δ%= -11.1%, p=0.00); Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Re-sistance (HOMA-IR) (Δ%=-62.1%, p=0.01). After VLCKD1 a significant increase of uricemia, cre-atinine and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (respectively Δ%=35%, p=0.01; Δ%=5.9%, p=0.02; Δ%=25.5%, p=0.03). After VLCKD2 were reduced: BMI (Δ%=-11.2%, p=0.00); AFM (Δ%=-14.3%, p=0.00); GFM (Δ%=-6.3%, p=0.00); Appendicular Skeletal Muscle Mass Index (ASMMI) (Δ%=-17.5%, p=0.00); HOMA-IR (Δ%=-59,4%, p=0.02). After VLCKD2, uricemia (Δ%=63.1%, p=0.03), and Vitamin D levels (Δ%=25.7%, p=0.02) were increased. No significant changes of car-diovascular disease (CVD) indexes were observed after DTs. No significant changes of PPARγ lev-el in any DTs.
At the first visit, participants were instructed how to follow the LCKD as individuals or in small groups, with an initial goal of ≤20 g carbohydrate per day. Participants were taught the specific types and amounts of foods they could eat, as well as foods to avoid. Initially, participants were allowed unlimited amounts of meats, poultry, fish, shellfish, and eggs; 2 cups of salad vegetables per day; 1 cup of low-carbohydrate vegetables per day; 4 ounces of hard cheese; and limited amounts of cream, avocado, olives, and lemon juice. Fats and oils were not restricted except that intake of trans fats was to be minimized. Participants were provided a 3-page handout and a handbook [11] detailing these recommendations. Participants prepared or bought all of their own meals and snacks following these guidelines.
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