Importantly, in the current study, an improvement in the indexes of sleep was observed, especially at the point of maximum loss of fat mass (reduced ketosis). Sleep is essential to health and is associated with morbidities and mortality associated with obesity [52,53,54,55,56,57]. A recent study demonstrates that dietary protein intake while dieting to lose weight may improve sleep quality in overweight and obese adults [30]. We were unable to detect statistically significant changes in the sleep quality measured by the PSQI and indirectly corroborated with no changes during the treatment in the plasma levels of dopamine, a brain neurotransmitter synthetized from tryptophan. By contrast, the sleepiness during different real-life situations measured by the ESS was significantly reduced. This result is important because it can be associated with an improvement in the QoL, influencing parameters such as physical functioning, sexual life, and work activity. These parameters were improved after the VLCK diet treatment and contributed to an enhanced global score of quality of life evaluated by the IWQoL-Lite. The strength of this study is its longitudinal design, which allows the evaluation of the time-course of changes of psychological well-being induced by a VLCK diet. The small sample size of this study might be a limitation; however, as each subject underwent 4 evaluations and results compare with themselves, this adds statistical power to the study and a real difference between the experimental points. Moreover, the short follow-up of this study (4 months) increases the relevance of the findings as they were strong enough to be evident so rapidly. Other limitation could be that the results of this study were not comparable with a standard nonketogenic low-calorie diet. This was because this analysis was performed in previous studies [58,59,60,61,62].
Yes, you'll lose weight but only because you're consuming fewer calories. There's no real magic to the keto diet. The weight-loss equation remains the same: You lose weight when you consume fewer calories than you use each day. You're not burning more fat than other diets, or at a faster rate. On the keto diet, you eat high-fat meals with protein, which keeps you feeling full for longer and cuts down on your overall eating throughout the day.
A ketogenic diet could be an interesting alternative to treat certain conditions, and may accelerate weight loss. But it is hard to follow and it can be heavy on red meat and other fatty, processed, and salty foods that are notoriously unhealthy. We also do not know much about its long-term effects, probably because it’s so hard to stick with that people can’t eat this way for a long time. It is also important to remember that “yo-yo diets” that lead to rapid weight loss fluctuation are associated with increased mortality. Instead of engaging in the next popular diet that would last only a few weeks to months (for most people that includes a ketogenic diet), try to embrace change that is sustainable over the long term. A balanced, unprocessed diet, rich in very colorful fruits and vegetables, lean meats, fish, whole grains, nuts, seeds, olive oil, and lots of water seems to have the best evidence for a long, healthier, vibrant life.

Providing additional support Paoli et al. (17) examined the effect of a modified KD diet (~55% fat, 41% protein, and 4.5% CHO) on performance and body composition in gymnasts. In a crossover design, researchers compared independent 30-day dietary regimens consisting of “normal diet” (WD; 46.8% CHO, 38.5% fat, and 14.7% protein) and modified KD in nine elite male gymnasts. There were no significant changes from pre to post during either dietary intervention for measures of physical performance, indicating the absence of significant dietary CHO did not negatively impact physical ability. The post-KD measurements, however, saw a significant decrease in fat mass (pre: 5.3; post:
Health Impact News has reported on many of the disease reversing results of the ketogenic (high fat-moderate protein-low carb) diet. Now, a new study is looking at the positive effects of gut bacteria among those following a ketogenic diet for epilepsy. Even though Johns Hopkins used a ketogenic diet for curing epilepsy over 80 years ago, when medical drugs did not help epilepsy effectively, mainstream medicine continues to rely on new and expensive toxic drugs for epileptic children. The “cocktail” combinations of pharmaceutical drugs prescribed often worsens childhood epilepsy. Health Impact News previously published a report on how a four year old child with refractory epilepsy (not treatable with pharmaceutical medications), was treated at the Rochester, Minnesota Mayo Clinic using a ketogenic diet. At first, the child was also kept on pharmaceuticals. The results were poor until he was taken off the medications; then he began healing completely. A new Chinese study on pediatric epileptic cases may even draw the attention of mainstream medical professionals, due to the results seen in children's gut microbiota structure when following a high-fat ketogenic diet.
The end result of the “ketone diet” is staying fueled off of circulating high ketones (which are also sometimes called ketone bodies) — which is what’s responsible for altering your metabolism in a way that some people like to say turns you into a “fat-burning machine.” Both in terms of how it feels physically and mentally, along with the impact it has on the body, being in ketosis is very different than a “glycolytic state,” where blood glucose (sugar) serves as the body’s energy source.
If you’re looking to get a jump start on your health and fitness goals this year, you may be thinking about trying the ketogenic diet. Maybe you’ve heard the phrase before — it’s a huge diet buzzword — but aren’t sure what it means. Here’s a primer: The ketogenic diet is an eating plan that drives your body into ketosis, a state where the body uses fat as a primary fuel source (instead of carbohydrates), says Stacey Mattinson, RDN, who is based in Austin, Texas.
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