“As a board certified physician practicing internal and obesity medicine, I reclaimed my health and lost over 150 pounds by ignoring conventional medical advice. I now focus on diabetes, hypertension and lipid management through lifestyle and dietary modifications whenever possible. As well as seeing patients in my clinic, I provide remote consultations via tele-medicine software and equipment, utilizing remotely-tracked bio-impedance scales, blood pressure cuffs and continuous glucose monitoring devices.”
A ketogenic diet could be an interesting alternative to treat certain conditions, and may accelerate weight loss. But it is hard to follow and it can be heavy on red meat and other fatty, processed, and salty foods that are notoriously unhealthy. We also do not know much about its long-term effects, probably because it’s so hard to stick with that people can’t eat this way for a long time. It is also important to remember that “yo-yo diets” that lead to rapid weight loss fluctuation are associated with increased mortality. Instead of engaging in the next popular diet that would last only a few weeks to months (for most people that includes a ketogenic diet), try to embrace change that is sustainable over the long term. A balanced, unprocessed diet, rich in very colorful fruits and vegetables, lean meats, fish, whole grains, nuts, seeds, olive oil, and lots of water seems to have the best evidence for a long, healthier, vibrant life.
Instead of adding sugar to your coffee, you can put a few drops of stevia in there to sweeten it up. Stevia is a great sweetener and won’t increase your blood sugar levels – so it’s a perfect way to sweeten your morning coffee. If you find stevia to have a bitter aftertaste, erythritol and monk fruit extract are two other keto-friendly sweeteners worth trying.

Clinical improvement was observed in Alzheimer’s patients fed a ketogenic diet, and this was marked by improved mitochondrial function. (15) In fact, a European Journal of Clinical Nutrition study pointed to emerging data that suggested the therapeutic use of ketogenic diets for multiple neurological disorders beyond epilepsy and Alzheimer’s, including headaches, neurotrauma, Parkinson’s disease, sleep disorders, brain cancer, autism and multiple sclerosis. (16)
Requires an adaptation process. Getting keto adapted can take one to two weeks and the transition can be uncomfortable for some people. The “Keto Flu” is commonly used to describe flu-like symptoms associated with the transition process: headaches, fatigue, nausea, etc. Due to restricted carb intake, your body is not retaining as much water so loss of electrolytes is common. This can easily be rectified with taking mineral supplements or exogenous ketones, such as the beta hydroxybutyrate mineral salts in KetoLogic® BHB [16].
The only issue with keto, is really that I’m afraid that it might be hard to up my calories to a maintenance weight now that I’ve gotten a taste preference for the rich assortment of foods with no carbs in them. I’m satisfied with less calories than I will need after my excess fat is burned off… but , maybe I bet my body will send more hunger signs once there isn’t anymore body fat in the cupboard to use instead of what goes down my throat.

A CKD offers a way to combat this. It offers a cyclical "refeed" (sometimes also called a carb-up). During this phase, the diet consists mostly of complex carbohydrates, with limited fat, sucrose and fructose. Since the glycogen stores in the liver and muscles are depleted, these carbohydrates go straight to refilling them instead of being added to the body's fat stores. For this reason, the amount of calories consumed during a refeed can be far above an individual's usual dietary intake. While a typical CKD consists of 50g or less of carbohydrate per day, the typical refeed consists of 450-600g of carbohydrate. A weight gain of 1-2 lbs is usually reported during refeeding; this is mainly water and normally lost in 2–4 days.
Changes in food craving during the very low-calorie-ketogenic diet treatment. (A) Food craving trait and state. (B) Food craving inventory. Data represent mean ± standard error of changes from baseline. (ƚ) Denotes statistically significant differences through the intervention (p for trend < 0.05) evaluated by means of repeated-measures ANOVA. (*) Denotes statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) from baseline after post-hoc pairwise comparisons employing the Tukey’s adjustment for multiple comparisons.
There's a lot of exciting buzz around keto these days, and there's plenty of good reason for it.Ketosis is a natural process the body initiates to help us survive when food intake is low. During this state, your body is actually burning fat for energy instead of carbs. Ketosis is typically extremely hard to obtain on your own and takes weeks to accomplish.
Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and poor-quality fats from processed foods, with very few fruits and vegetables. Patients with kidney disease need to be cautious because this diet could worsen their condition. Additionally, some patients may feel a little tired in the beginning, while some may have bad breath, nausea, vomiting, constipation, and sleep problems.
Sleep enough – for most people at least seven hours per night on average – and keep stress under control. Sleep deprivation and stress hormones raise blood sugar levels, slowing ketosis and weight loss a bit. Plus they might make it harder to stick to a keto diet, and resist temptations. So while handling sleep and stress will not get you into ketosis on it’s own, it’s still worth thinking about.
Nurse practitioners (NP) are advanced practice registered nurses that manage acute and chronic medical conditions, both physical and mental, through history and physical exam and the ordering of diagnostic tests and medical treatments. NPs are qualified to diagnose medical problems, order treatments, perform advanced procedures, prescribe medications, and make referrals for a wide range of acute and chronic medical conditions within their scope of practice. Their education includes a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) or other undergraduate degree, and requires a license as a registered nurse (RN) and experience as an RN in a health care setting. They must graduate from an accredited graduate (MSN) or doctoral (DNP) program and achieve a board certification.

What this shows is that there is very little difference in heart disease risk relative to total cholesterol above and below 200. In fact, no significant increase in risk was measured until total cholesterol reached an excess of 240. There also seems to be a protective role that having a total cholesterol above 180 serves both for heart disease and healthy mental function.
Very low calorie diets are not something you should try alone. Consuming over-the-counter meal replacement products is not the same kind of treatment your doctor will provide you. In addition, ketones are not the ideal energy supplier — but rather a "will do" supplier — and this underscores how important it is that VLCDs are short in duration and guided by a qualified health care professional. In addition, many VLCD treatments involve supplementing with prescription medications to help with weight loss, which provides a measure of effectiveness you are not likely to get by going it alone.
By discriminating the components of the FFM as determined by DXA, it was observed that these variations were mainly due to changes in lean mass, whereas bone mineral content remained unchanged from baseline (0.003 ± 0.066 kg at visit C-2; −0.018 ± 0.066 kg at visit C-3; and −0.028 ± 0.066 kg at visit C-4; P > 0.05). Given that DXA technique is unable to discriminate the composition of lean mass, the question was raised as to whether the observed reductions in lean mass were at the expense of muscle mass or body water content. Therefore, further analysis was performed by MF-BIA , which is able to discriminate these 2 variables. Remarkably, the measurements performed by MF-BIA showed that the initial loss of FFM at visit C-2 (−3.1 ± 1.5 kg) was mostly due to total body water loss (−2.3 ± 1.1 kg), both intra- (−1.5 ± 0.7 kg) and extracellular [−0.8 ± 0.5 kg; Fig. 3(B)], probably because of the intense diuresis that occurs in the first phase of any VLCK diet. In subsequent visits, a slight recovery of intra- and extracellular water was observed, similar to the recovery observed with total FFM. This means that reductions attributable to muscle mass were, depending on the method used, around 1 kg throughout the 4-month study; only 5% of the total 20.2 kg of weight lost was FFM.

All of the patients followed a VLCK diet according to a commercial weight loss program (PNK Method), which includes lifestyle and behavioral modification support. The intervention included an evaluation by the specialist physician conducting the study and assessment by an expert dietician. All patients underwent a structured program of physical exercise with external supervision (16). This method is based on high-biological-value protein preparations obtained from cow milk, soya, avian eggs, green peas, and cereals. Each preparation contained 15 g protein, 4 g carbohydrates, 3 g fat, and 50 mg docosahexaenoic acid, and provided 90 to 100 kcal (16).
The primary outcome, hemoglobin A1c, decreased from 7.5 ± 1.4% at baseline to 6.3 ± 1.0% at week 16 (p < 0.001), a 1.2% absolute decrease and a 16% relative decrease (Table ​(Table4).4). All but two participants (n = 19 or 90%) had a decrease in hemoglobin A1c (Figure ​(Figure1).1). The absolute decrease in hemoglobin A1c was at least 1.0% in 11 (52%) participants. The relative decrease in hemoglobin A1c from baseline was greater than 10% in 14 (67%) participants, and greater than 20% in 6 (29%) participants. In regression analyses, the change in hemoglobin A1c was not predicted by the change in body weight, waist circumference, or percent body fat at 16 weeks (all p > 0.05).

19. Soejima E., Ohki T., Kurita Y., Yuan X., Tanaka K., Kakino S., Hara K., Nakayama H., Tajiri Y., Yamada K. Protective effect of 3-hydroxybutyrate against endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated vascular endothelial cell damage induced by low glucose exposure. PLoS ONE. 2018;13:e0191147. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0191147. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
Carbohydrate-restricted diets are no more effective than a conventional healthy diet in preventing the onset of type 2 diabetes, but for people with type 2 diabetes they are a viable option for losing weight or helping with glycemic control.[11][12][13] There is little evidence that low-carbohydrate dieting is helpful in managing type 1 diabetes.[1] The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes should adopt a generally healthy diet, rather than a diet focused on carbohydrate or other macronutrients.[13]
I think you may be experiencing what I did on an ultra low carb diet. I did try to follow the "20 grams of carbs" approach but it didn't work for me. I felt sluggish, I was tired, and anxious (especially that anxiety!). Having said that, I have Hashimoto's (autoimmune hypothyroid condition) and I can't do very low-carb for that very reason. These days I eat 20-30 grams of net carbs, sometimes up to 50, especially after a workout when my body naturally craves carbs. Keep in mind that some people tend to overemphasise the importance of high ketones while it's not as simple and most people don't even need high ketones: The Ketone Craze - Who Really Benefits From High Ketone Levels? I hope this helps!
The first signs of ketosis are known as the “keto flu” where headaches, brain fogginess, fatigue, and the like can really rile your body up. Make sure that you’re drinking plenty of waterand eating plenty of salt. The ketogenic diet is a natural diuretic and you’ll be peeing more than normal. Take into account that you’re peeing out electrolytes, and you can guess that you’ll be having a thumping headache in no time. Keeping your salt intake and water intake high enough is very important, allowing your body to re-hydrate and re-supply your electrolytes. Doing this will help with the headaches, if not get rid of them completely.
×