I have been keto for 1,5 month, lost up to 20 pounds and felt it was overall easy to do. passed the keto flu :  20gr net carbs, 70 % fat and max 20% protein from fish and eggs mainly  ... I drink 3 ltrs of water in which I add lite salt, lemon and some green like parsley ... my blood markers are super healthy except for cholesterol but it was when I was overdoing the dairy which I barely eat anymore ..

As keto grows in popularity, I see more women struggle with it. My anecdotal observation in my medical office and working with people online is that younger men seem to perform best, and better than women of all ages in nutritional ketosis. My female patients, myself included, may have more problems on keto, with their stress hormones (i.e. producing too much cortisol), thyroid function, and may even develop menstrual irregularities. Some women do fine, others may feel worse, suffer from mood issues, and can even gain weight. We are still learning more about why men fare better than women (it may be related to their higher muscle mass). Additionally, there are at least ten genes that may make a person less likely to benefit from keto.


In order to transition and remain in this state, aiming for about 30–50 net grams is typically the recommended amount of total carbs to start with. This is considered a more moderate or flexible approach but can be less overwhelming to begin with. Once you’re more accustomed to “eating keto,” you can choose to lower carbs even more if you’d like (perhaps only from time to time), down to about 20 grams of net carbs daily. This is considered the standard, “strict” amount that many keto dieters aim to adhere to for best results, but remember that everyone is a bit different.
“When the low-fat dietary advice I had been preaching for decades didn’t work for me in middle age, I changed to low-carb. After mentorship from Dr. Eric Westman, I introduced low-carb to my patients with astonishing results reversing diseases I had only been “managing”. In fact, more than 90% of patients who come to me on insulin are able to come off. I run a multidisciplinary medical weight loss clinic helping to restore health. This has brought the joy back into medicine for me. Diet Doctor has been an amazing resource to help me and my patients in this journey.”

“As a family doctor, I not only lost weight and improved my own health with the low-carb diet, I also inspired colleagues and patients alike to follow this lifestyle and reap its benefits. It has now become a powerful tool I use in my daily practice to help treat and reverse obesity, diabetes, fatty liver, PCOS, and chronic pain. I refer all my English-speaking patients to the Diet Doctor website and I also use it during visits as a counseling tool. Inspired by Diet Doctor, I have created my own website to cater to French-speaking patients!”


“I have personally followed a low-carb, keto diet for over 20 years for my own health, and have used it for over 15 years with patients, primarily for weight loss. Recently, I have found the medical version of the ketogenic diet to have antipsychotic effects and mood benefits in patients with chronic mental illness, so I am pioneering the clinical use of the ketogenic diet in psychiatry. I often recommend Diet Doctor to patients, friends, and family as a trustworthy resource for weight loss versions of the diet. For the treatment of serious mental illness, I recommend working with a trained clinician.”
Recently, four studies have re-examined the effect of carbohydrate restriction on type 2 diabetes. One outpatient study enrolled 54 participants with type 2 diabetes (out of 132 total participants) and found that hemoglobin A1c improved to a greater degree over one year with a low-carbohydrate diet compared with a low-fat, calorie-restricted diet [5,6]. Another study enrolled 8 men with type 2 diabetes in a 5-week crossover outpatient feeding study that tested similar diets [7]. The participants had greater improvement in glycohemoglobin while on the low-carbohydrate diet than when on a eucaloric low-fat diet. The third study was an inpatient feeding study in 10 participants with type 2 diabetes [8]. After only 14 days, hemoglobin A1c improved from 7.3% to 6.8%. In the fourth study, 16 participants with type 2 diabetes who followed a 20% carbohydrate diet had improvement of hemoglobin A1c from 8.0% to 6.6% over 24 weeks [9]. Only these latter three studies targeted glycemic control as a goal, and two of these were intensely-monitored efficacy studies in which all food was provided to participants for the duration of the study [7,8]. Three of the studies [6,8,9] mentioned that diabetic medications were adjusted but only one of them provided detailed information regarding these adjustments [9]. This information is critical for patients on medication for diabetes who initiate a low-carbohydrate diet because of the potential for adverse effects resulting from hypoglycemia.
Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and poor-quality fats from processed foods, with very few fruits and vegetables. Patients with kidney disease need to be cautious because this diet could worsen their condition. Additionally, some patients may feel a little tired in the beginning, while some may have bad breath, nausea, vomiting, constipation, and sleep problems.

In 2017, Drs. Kevin Hall and Juen Guo published what may be the first meta-analysis of controlled feeding studies that compared diets of equal calorie and protein content but differing in carbohydrate and fat content [4]. They made sure only to include studies in which all of the food was provided by the researchers. With these criteria, Drs. Kevin Hall and Juen Guo were able to ensure that confounding variables like the thermic effect of protein and subjects self-reporting their calorie intake wouldn’t muddle up the findings.


When the craving for alcohol was evaluated, no statistically significant changes were observed in the MACS scores through the nutritional intervention, taking all patients together (Table S1). However, when the analysis was performed considering the gender of participants in the study, men experienced a significant decrease in the total score through the study (p = 0.047). This decrease was more notable in the maximum ketosis phase as compared with baseline (−15.14; p = 0.047). Moreover, a statistically significant reduction was observed in the lack of inhibition item (−27.19; p = 0.042).
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