Leftovers will be another thing we will take into consideration. Not only is it easier on you, but why put yourself through the hassle to cook the same food more than once? Breakfast is something I normally do leftover style, where I don’t have to worry about it in the morning and I certainly don’t have to stress about it. Grab some food out the fridge, pre-made for me, and head out the door. It doesn’t get much easier than that, does it?


I understand your point, and thanks for the reply. I suppose I'm wondering this because when I go through foods (meats in particular, it seems) in the database on MFP, the keto-friendly foods seem to be high in calories. So, I'm wondering if it will be difficult to keep a calorie ceiling of around 1200-1500 per day. My guess would be I'll have to emphasize vegetables moreso than meat in my diet to maintain that level.
Lastly, if you're active, you might need to make some adjustments to take that into account. "For the first one to two weeks, temporarily reducing your exercise load can be helpful as your body adjusts to being in ketosis," he says. "Additionally, for those who have an intense workout schedule, carb cycling may be a good option." Carb cycling essentially means you'll increase your carb intake on the days you're doing exercise, ideally just two to three days per week. "While low-carb days may be around 20 to 30 grams of net carbs daily, high-carb days can range all the way up to 100 grams, although it can vary based on your size and activity level," says Dr. Axe. (Related: 8 Things You Need to Know About Exercising on the Keto Diet.) 
The insulin theory of obesity, in short, declares that the primary cause of obesity is higher carbohydrate diets because these diets increase insulin secretion more than any other diet. When insulin levels are high, fat storage will increase significantly and “starve” muscles and organs of energy.   This causes increased hunger and overeating that results in obesity.

Helps to control type 2 diabetes and other metabolic disorders: If you have diabetes, you may be turning to the ketogenic diet as a way to control your insulin and glucose levels. Early research shows that the ketogenic diet can help you significantly improve insulin sensitivity levels (11). One study even shows that some diabetes patients were able to stop taking their diabetes medication altogether while on the keto diet (12)!

“After years of practicing Family & Sports Medicine, I’ve recognized that preventing and addressing my patients’ dietary metabolic issues are the foundation upon which quality medical and musculoskeletal care are built. LCHF principles produced such remarkable results in my patients that I completely redefined my scope of practice and developed a unique Lifestyle Medicine Program that synergistically complements my Sports Medicine & Non-Surgical Orthopedics specialty practice. I truly care for the whole person. Diet Doctor is an exceptional, comprehensive resource for lay persons and clinicians; I recommend it to all my patients and colleagues.”
For obesity-reduction experts, it is well known that the main obstacle to follow a hypocaloric diet is hunger. In fact, within a few days after undertaking such a calorie-lowered diet, patients suffered a battery of negative effects, such as hunger, sadness, bad humor, and, in some cases, mild depression. All these side effects were absent in the patients following a VLCK diet, thus contributing to the success of these types of treatments. The mechanism that erases hunger and sadness in obese subjects following a VLCK diet are not known, and several authors strongly believe that it is due to the anorexigenic effect of ketosis [42]. As a result, of that rationale, the target of this work was to study the neurocognitive effects of ketosis, using a battery of neurocognitive and QoL tests in the same individuals at three different stages; (a) nonketosis-nonweight reduction (basal), (b) highly ketosis-mild weight reduction (visit 2), and (c) nonketosis-strong (mean 20 kg) weight reduction.
Collagen is a type of protein that has been shown to suppress appetite[*], provide fullness compared to other proteins like whey, casein, or soy[*], help retain muscle mass[*] and even help to reduce the appearance of cellulite due to it’s ability to improve skin elasticity and thickness[*]. Refer to this article for more information on the benefits of collagen and the best way to supplement it in your diet.
Effect of the nutritional intervention with a very low-calorie-ketogenic diet on physical activity pattern (A) and sleep disturbances (B). Data represent mean ± standard error of changes from baseline. (ƚ) Denotes statistically significant differences through the intervention (p for trend < 0.05) evaluated by means of repeated-measures ANOVA. (*) Denotes statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) from baseline after post-hoc pairwise comparisons employing the Tukey’s adjustment for multiple comparisons. IPQA, International Physical Activity Questionnaire.
Some people on a keto or low carb diet choose to count total carbs instead of net carbs. This makes it more difficult to fit in more leafy greens and low carb vegetables (which are filled with fiber), so you should only try that if you don’t get results with a net carb method. And, start with reducing sugar alcohols and low carb treats before deciding to do a “total carbs” method.
Note that women with thyroid or adrenal dysregulation require more healthy carbs. In general, the optimal carbohydrate level for you can vary over the years, such as when you’re more active physically or breastfeeding or stressed. Chronically eating low carb may increase your risk of mood disorders, so I urge caution and that you work with your healthcare professional. To be safe, eat the most carbs that you can tolerate while staying in ketosis.
The Johns Hopkins Hospital protocol for initiating the ketogenic diet has been widely adopted.[43] It involves a consultation with the patient and their caregivers and, later, a short hospital admission.[19] Because of the risk of complications during ketogenic diet initiation, most centres begin the diet under close medical supervision in the hospital.[9]
1. Reduce carbs. How much? The short answer is to eat 20 to 25 grams each day for weight loss, and 25 to 30 for weight maintenance. (You must use a nutrition calculator for macronutrients to get it right because thinking in terms of grams is not intuitive, and nutritional ketosis is less likely to be successful if you try to “eyeball” the amounts.) The long answer is: it depends. I encourage people to limit carbs until they are in ketosis, as confirmed with a blood ketone meter (see below), and then try increasing the amount of carbs by 5 grams to see if they stay in ketosis.
I actually went on a ketogenic diet last year to see if it would help my migraines. I have a history of chronic migraines which would usually last 3 days, sometimes longer. Triptans help a lot but I don’t like having to take them. I stayed in ketosis for about 8 months and experienced a significant reduction in migraines, from feeling some type of headache (mild o r severe) almost everyday to 1 or 2x per month while in ketosis. Although I’m very healthy otherwise, I do think my migraines may have something to do with blood sugar fluctuations (despite previously eating a whole foods diet and no refined carbs), and keto totally stabilized this. I eventually came off of Keto because I’m not really a meat lover. When I came off, but remained low carb, my migraines stayed under control for the most part. When I increase carbs, they do return.
At its core, weight loss results from burning more calories than you consume. But the macronutrient composition of those calories is also vital. Different foods have substantially different metabolic and hormonal effects on the body. So what’s eaten (and how calories are expended) can change how much you eat and whether those calories are burned or stored.

A cyclic ketogenic diet (or carb-cycling) is a low-carbohydrate diet with intermittent periods of high or moderate carbohydrate consumption. This is a form of the general ketogenic diet that is used as a way to maximize fat loss while maintaining the ability to perform high-intensity exercise. A ketogenic diet limits the number of grams of carbohydrate the dieter may eat, which may be anywhere between 0 and 50g per day. The remainder of the caloric intake must come primarily from fat sources and protein sources in order to maintain ketosis (the condition in which the body burns fats and uses ketones instead of glucose for fuel).
The popular belief that high-fat diets cause obesity and several other diseases such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cancer has not been observed in recent epidemiological studies. Studies carried out in animals that were fed high-fat diets did not show a specific causal relationship between dietary fat and obesity. On the contrary, very-low-carbohydrate and high-fat diets such as the ketogenic diet have shown to beneficial to weight loss.
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