Gottfried recommends the keto diet (as it’s commonly called) to help with a range of brain and focus issues—she finds ketones to be “very efficient fuel for the brain”; she also says it works well for some patients (not all) who want to lose weight but have trouble kicking sugar cravings. We talked to her about who the keto diet is right for (and whom, or when, it isn’t); the nutritional ins and outs of mastering it; and which keto-friendly meals are healthy for practically everyone, regardless of what diet we do (or don’t) practice.
A ketogenic diet changes this. When you go keto, your body goes into ketosis, a glycogen-deprived state from the low carb intake. Instead, fat is oxidized to produce energy, resulting in ketones. Unlike glucose, which provides quick bursts of energy, the energy from fat burns slower. As a result, you may avoid sugar crashes right after a high-carb meal being on a keto diet.

A Ketogenic diet is one that is high in healthy fats and proteins, and extremely low in carbohydrates.  Typically, it takes around 100g of carbohydrates per day to keep up with the average person's brain and organ function.  When you eat between 20-50 g of net carbohydrates (total carbohydrates – fiber) your body has to switch over to using fat to fuel itself instead of carbohydrates.  This process is called Ketosis, and it's a perfectly natural state of humans to exist in.

To figure out how many fat grams specifically you want, you would take the total number of calories it takes to maintain your body weight (normally around 14-16 calories per pound of body weight). Subtract your protein calories from that number and then divide by 9 (number of calories per gram of fat). This should give you how many total fat grams you need to eat per day.
“I started a low-carb, high-fat diet for myself in an attempt to treat my own health problems. Since then, I have seen significant health benefits not only in myself but also in many of my patients using a LCHF/ketogenic approach. Diet Doctor gives a simple but very effective evidence-based resource that I confidently recommend to all my patients. And the recipes are great!”
I think Tammy is asking about labeling on products. I have also found the percentages to be inconsistent. I think it is due to the way they companies calculate the grams in relation to the average daily intake- the result being different as the range  goes from 225-325 grams per day. At the end of the day the company decides how they calculate the percentage so the best way to solve this is to look at the grams instead.
Twenty participants were tasked with following a very-low-calorie keto (VLCK) diet consisting of 600 to 800 calories. They took supplemental docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) omega-3 fats, vitamins, and minerals. DHA is an important structural component of the human brain, which was added to participants’ diets to ensure their body had enough of the component during fat loss. They took vitamins and minerals to make up for the nutrients lost from carb-containing foods. Meanwhile, they also followed a “formal exercise program.” The program was not defined in the study paper, and the study authors were not available for comment by this story’s publication.

HDL stands for high-density lipoprotein and its primary role in the body is actually to sweep up LDL particles and return them to the liver for recycling. This is because LDL is actually very susceptible to oxidation so it must be cleared from the blood efficiently. This means when LDL is exposed to chronic inflammation, it becomes damaged. The longer LDL remains in the blood stream and the higher your inflammation levels are, the higher your risk of heart disease. 

Muscular strength was measured with a Jamar handgrip dynamometer (Lafayette Instruments, Lafayette, IN). After a brief demonstration and verbal instructions, the test was performed in the standing position with the wrist in the neutral position and the elbow flexed to 90 degrees. Patients were given verbal encouragement to squeeze as hard as possible and to apply maximal effort for at least 3 seconds. Two trials were allowed in the dominant limb, and the highest score was recorded as peak grip strength (kg). Considering possible influences on the muscular strength of changes in body composition, handgrip strength (HG) was divided by appendicular lean mass (ALM) determined by DXA (HG/ALM) and by appendicular soft lean mass (ASLM) determined by MF-BIA (HG/ASLM).

Long-term compliance is low and can be a big issue with a ketogenic diet, but this is the case with any lifestyle change.  Even though the ketogenic diet is significantly superior in the induction of weight loss in otherwise healthy patients with obesity and the induced weight loss is rapid, intense, and sustained until at least 2 year, the understanding of the clinical impacts, safety, tolerability, efficacy, duration of treatment, and prognosis after discontinuation of the diet is challenging and requires further studies to understand the disease-specific mechanisms.
“As an ophthalmologist, I use a low-carb, high-fat diet approach with intermittent fasting to treat and prevent vision loss associated with diabetic retinopathy in my patients. In addition to my ophthalmology practice, I also treat patients with obesity and metabolic diseases with positive results. I recommend the Diet Doctor website to all my patients so that they get a deep understanding of the low-carb, high-fat approach. It has all the valuable resources they need for a successful ketogenic lifestyle.”
At the first visit, participants were instructed how to follow the LCKD as individuals or in small groups, with an initial goal of ≤20 g carbohydrate per day. Participants were taught the specific types and amounts of foods they could eat, as well as foods to avoid. Initially, participants were allowed unlimited amounts of meats, poultry, fish, shellfish, and eggs; 2 cups of salad vegetables per day; 1 cup of low-carbohydrate vegetables per day; 4 ounces of hard cheese; and limited amounts of cream, avocado, olives, and lemon juice. Fats and oils were not restricted except that intake of trans fats was to be minimized. Participants were provided a 3-page handout and a handbook [11] detailing these recommendations. Participants prepared or bought all of their own meals and snacks following these guidelines.
I’ve been trying this keto diet that my dr.and daughter recommended, it’s been close to a week. I’ve changed my food intake, no bad carbs that I know of, was a huge chip addict stopped all that with no cravings. I’m not seeing any results I’m getting discouraged and everything sounds so complicated watching this, measuring that, I don’t have a clue what I’m doing. just that I stopped bread,pasta,poratoes,rice all those kind of carbs.I’m drinking more water eating green vegetables and trying to increase my fat intake. I don’t feel motivated to exercise which probably doesn’t help and have 100-130 to lose. I need help I don’t understand or have the time create a lot of meals and measure my fat,protein and carb intake.

Hi Barb, That can definitely be it. Losing when you are close to goal can be more difficult. It could also be that your body’s healthy weight is a little higher than what you’d like – which doesn’t mean you can’t lose, but makes it more difficult. If just eating Keto foods isn’t working, double check the macros for your weight and see if the amount you’re eating needs to be adjusted. You’ll find more help and support in our support group here.


A popular keto supplement are exogenous ketones (popularly called “keto diet pills”) that may help you achieve results earlier as well as remain in that state. (Don’t confuse exogenous ketones with raspberry ketones, as the latter don’t raise ketone levels in the body or mimic endogenous ketones, so you wouldn’t use raspberry ketones in your regimen.)

Recently, four studies have re-examined the effect of carbohydrate restriction on type 2 diabetes. One outpatient study enrolled 54 participants with type 2 diabetes (out of 132 total participants) and found that hemoglobin A1c improved to a greater degree over one year with a low-carbohydrate diet compared with a low-fat, calorie-restricted diet [5,6]. Another study enrolled 8 men with type 2 diabetes in a 5-week crossover outpatient feeding study that tested similar diets [7]. The participants had greater improvement in glycohemoglobin while on the low-carbohydrate diet than when on a eucaloric low-fat diet. The third study was an inpatient feeding study in 10 participants with type 2 diabetes [8]. After only 14 days, hemoglobin A1c improved from 7.3% to 6.8%. In the fourth study, 16 participants with type 2 diabetes who followed a 20% carbohydrate diet had improvement of hemoglobin A1c from 8.0% to 6.6% over 24 weeks [9]. Only these latter three studies targeted glycemic control as a goal, and two of these were intensely-monitored efficacy studies in which all food was provided to participants for the duration of the study [7,8]. Three of the studies [6,8,9] mentioned that diabetic medications were adjusted but only one of them provided detailed information regarding these adjustments [9]. This information is critical for patients on medication for diabetes who initiate a low-carbohydrate diet because of the potential for adverse effects resulting from hypoglycemia.
First reported in 2003, the idea of using a form of the Atkins diet to treat epilepsy came about after parents and patients discovered that the induction phase of the Atkins diet controlled seizures. The ketogenic diet team at Johns Hopkins Hospital modified the Atkins diet by removing the aim of achieving weight loss, extending the induction phase indefinitely, and specifically encouraging fat consumption. Compared with the ketogenic diet, the modified Atkins diet (MAD) places no limit on calories or protein, and the lower overall ketogenic ratio (about 1:1) does not need to be consistently maintained by all meals of the day. The MAD does not begin with a fast or with a stay in hospital and requires less dietitian support than the ketogenic diet. Carbohydrates are initially limited to 10 g per day in children or 20 g per day in adults, and are increased to 20–30 g per day after a month or so, depending on the effect on seizure control or tolerance of the restrictions. Like the ketogenic diet, the MAD requires vitamin and mineral supplements and children are carefully and periodically monitored at outpatient clinics.[48]
Basically, carbohydrates are the primary source of energy production in body tissues. When the body is deprived of carbohydrates due to reducing intake to less than 50g per day, insulin secretion is significantly reduced and the body enters a catabolic state. Glycogen stores deplete, forcing the body to go through certain metabolic changes. Two metabolic processes come into action when there is low carbohydrate availability in body tissues: gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis.[4][5]
Many unhealthy foods easily meet keto’s low-carb, high-fat criteria. However, that doesn’t mean you can or should eat them freely. “A huge benefit to following the keto diet is that the vast majority of processed food is removed with the removal of grains,” Santo says. “Unfortunately, poor-quality dairy, meat, and veggies may fill the gap.” Look for healthier sources of protein and fat, such as grass-fed meats, and limit processed dairy (think cheese singles) as much as possible.
The ketogenic diet is a medical nutrition therapy that involves participants from various disciplines. Team members include a registered paediatric dietitian who coordinates the diet programme; a paediatric neurologist who is experienced in offering the ketogenic diet; and a registered nurse who is familiar with childhood epilepsy. Additional help may come from a medical social worker who works with the family and a pharmacist who can advise on the carbohydrate content of medicines. Lastly, the parents and other caregivers must be educated in many aspects of the diet for it to be safely implemented.[5]
Hey Donna, yes frozen veggies are totally fine! And my best advice would be to just jump right back into it and not dwell on the past! I would recommend tracking your carbs and making sure they are low enough to get back into keto, maybe try some intermittent fasting as well. It will take a few days to get back on track but just stick with it and focus on your goals!

It’s been a disaster this calories in, calories out. I mean look at the effect. Since we have adopted that philosophy we have worldwide epidemics of obesity, diabetes, faKy liver and so on… It’s been a disaster and the sooner we forget about it… It’s sort of an attractive concept, you know, what you bring in, what you take out… But unfortunately it doesn’t work.
The retention and need for a diuretic in the past may have been from excessive carb/wheat/dairy intake… Something you may find resolves with a ketogenic diet. Decreasing iodized salt and increasing sea salt, especially himilayian pink salt might help you to maintain sodium levels without the fluid retention effects also. For example I always buy unsalted butter and add pink salt for the flavour/sodium component. It’s made a big difference for me (a fellow massive found retainer haha)
The ketogenic diet has been studied in at least 14 rodent animal models of seizures. It is protective in many of these models and has a different protection profile than any known anticonvulsant. Conversely, fenofibrate, not used clinically as an antiepileptic, exhibits experimental anticonvulsant properties in adult rats comparable to the ketogenic diet.[58] This, together with studies showing its efficacy in patients who have failed to achieve seizure control on half a dozen drugs, suggests a unique mechanism of action.[56]
“In 2010 I came face-to-face with the compelling, robust evidence for the effectiveness of the low-carb, high-fat diet to prevent and treat serious diseases like diabetes, obesity and heart disease. It contradicted everything I knew as a doctor and scientist about optimal nutrition. I have since aimed to change medical dogma and foster respectful dialogue on evidence-based nutrition, but at a brutal personal and professional cost, even though eventually vindicated. The Noakes Foundation, since 2012, has been promoting unbiased nutritional research into the effects of LCHF on all aspects of human health. The sugar-free train is bound for glory.”
Measuring blood ketones is the most reliable method. There is a home blood test you can use, but the strips can be very expensive. An alternative is to measure ketones in the urine with a dipstick test, which is much more accessible and inexpensive. However, this method is much less reliable and as time goes on and the body adapts to ketosis, it becomes even less reliable.
In steps 4 and 5, the ketogenic phases were ended by the physician in charge of the patient based on the amount of weight lost, and the patient started a low-calorie diet (800 to 1500 kcal/d). At this point, the patients underwent a progressive incorporation of different food groups and participated in a program of alimentary re-education to guarantee long-term maintenance of the weight loss. The maintenance diet consisted of an eating plan that was balanced with respect to carbohydrates, protein, and fat. Depending on the individual, the calories consumed ranged between 1500 and 2000 kcal/d, and the objective was to maintain the weight loss and promote a healthy lifestyle.
As the popularity of the Keto Diet has exploded in recent years the true nature of Ketogenic weight loss has gotten blurred. So what is Keto? Very simply Keto refers to Ketosis, the state into which your body enters when it shifts to burning fat for energy instead of carbohydrates. As carbohydrates and sugar intake is restricted, your body begins to break down its fat stores to use as a source of energy. Therefore, the very basics of a Ketogenic Diet are:
Protein can turn into carbohydrates via a metabolic process called gluconeogenesis (making new carbs) and will do in people at varying degrees. Protein turning into carbohydrates means you’re not in ketosis. However, this is generally an overblown statement that only happens at the extreme cases when you are drinking a lot of liquid protein shakes. 
After 4 months the VLCK diet induced a −20.2 ± 4.5 kg weight loss, at expenses of reductions in fat mass (FM) of −16.5 ± 5.1 kg (DXA), −18.2 ± 5.8 kg (MF-BIA), and −17.7 ± 9.9 kg (ADP). A substantial decrease was also observed in the visceral FM. The mild but marked reduction in fat-free mass occurred at maximum ketosis, primarily as a result of changes in total body water, and was recovered thereafter. No changes in muscle strength were observed. A strong correlation was evidenced between the 3 methods of assessing body composition.
This week we’re getting stricter with our fasting. We had a full week of intermittent fasting and now we’re going to skip breakfast and lunch. Water is our BEST friend here! Don’t forget that you can drink coffee, tea, flavored water, and the like to get your liquids in. Keep drinking to make sure you’re not thinking about your stomach. It MIGHT start growling, just ignore it – your body will adjust with time.
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