Excess fat mass (FM), especially visceral fat, is associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and even cancer (1–4), as well as an increase in overall and cardiovascular mortality (2, 5). Very-low-calorie diets are commonly used as obesity treatments; however, a primary concern in using such diets is the amount of fat-free mass (FFM; i.e., muscular tissue) that is lost together with the FM (6). This could produce so-called sarcopenic obesity, that is, the coexistence of an excess of FM and a decline in FFM that yields a near-normal body weight (7). Sarcopenic obesity constitutes a double impact on the health of patients, because the reduction in muscle mass and muscle strength is also a cause of cardiometabolic disorders, such as myocardial infarction and stroke, and other adverse health outcomes (5, 7–9). For these reasons, it is of primary interest to find weight loss strategies that promote preferential loss of FM and preservation of muscle mass and its functional status (i.e., muscle strength) (10–12).
I get many questions about intermittent fasting, the health benefits, the weight loss benefits, and the like. People normally use intermittent fasting for both the energy and mental clarity it can offer. But it’s not just good for that. It can offer breakthroughs of plateaus and even benefits in nutrient uptake in exercise. We go more in depth to intermittent fasting in Week 3 and 4, so keep your eyes peeled!

Loading up on fat lowers your levels of insulin. Insulin is a hormone that tells your body to store energy, either as fat or glucose.[4][5] The more insulin your body releases, the more fat that gets stored. Insulin also blocks leptin, the hormone that sends a signal to your brain when you’ve eaten enough to meet your energy needs.[6] That means when you eat carb-heavy foods, you’re at risk of overeating and won’t get that full feeling before reaching for a second helping of potatoes.
Purnell JQ, Hokanson JE, Marcovina SM, Steffes MW, Cleary PA, Brunzell JD. Effect of excessive weight gain with intensive therapy of type 1 diabetes on lipid levels and blood pressure: results from the DCCT. Diabetes Control and Complications Trial. JAMA. 1998;280:140–146. doi: 10.1001/jama.280.2.140. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]

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If you want to successfully lose weight with a Ketogenic weight loss program…successful meaning you lose weight and learn how to keep it off…then a Keto Diet is NOT another do-it-yourself, magazine of the month yo-yo diet trend. Ketogenic Diets are based on the science of weight loss and how human physiology responds to sugar, carbohydrates, insulin and fat storage.
Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and poor-quality fats from processed foods, with very few fruits and vegetables. Patients with kidney disease need to be cautious because this diet could worsen their condition. Additionally, some patients may feel a little tired in the beginning, while some may have bad breath, nausea, vomiting, constipation, and sleep problems.
Participants were recruited from the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) outpatient clinics. Inclusion criteria were age 35–75 years; body mass index (BMI) >25 kg/m2; and fasting serum glucose >125 mg/dL or hemoglobin A1c >6.5% without medications, or treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA) and/or insulin. Exclusion criteria were evidence of renal insufficiency, liver disease, or unstable cardiovascular disease by history, physical examination, and laboratory tests. All participants provided written informed consent approved by the institutional review board. No monetary incentives were provided.

The results of the Bland-Altman approach in regard to the FM% are shown in Fig. 4. MF-BIA underestimates the FM% during all visits, although with increasing body fat there is a trend toward better agreement [Fig. 4(A)]. This negative slope was significant in visits C2 (P = 0.015), C3 (P = 0.003), and C4 (P = 0.005). Importantly, MF-BIA had a consistent variability of about 5% in determining FM% when compared with DXA. However, the concordance between DXA and ADP is shown in Fig. 4(B). In visits C1 (P = 0.005), C2 (P = 0.010), and C3 (P = 0.004) significant negative slopes were observed, indicating underestimation of ADP at lower levels of FM%, but ADP seemed to overestimate FM% with increasing body fat. During visit C-4, a similar pattern was observed, although the slope did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.093). During all visits there was a high variability in the FM% determined by ADP, reaching values of up to 20% in comparison with DXA.
Other experts say the long-term accumulation of ketones could be harmful. “Those ketones are emergency fuel sources, and we’re not meant to run on them long-term,” says Kristen Kizer, a registered dietitian at Houston Methodist Hospital. “Ketones are negatively-charged molecules, which means they’re acidic. When you build up ketone bodies in your system, you’re building up acid. One of the ways your body buffers acid is by pulling calcium from your bones.” Kizer also notes that the diet isn't very balanced and involves a very high intake of animal products, which generally do not protect against cancer, diabetes, or other diseases.

“I have been a UK family doctor since 1990, and discovered the low-carb and keto ways of life in 2014. Until then, I had never seen a way of eating that resulted in normal weight and improvements in other health problems like diabetes, epilepsy, arthritis, and asthma. When I discovered Diet Doctor I was very impressed, and loved the recipes. I now run low-carb courses for the public and health care professionals.”
I was a Corpsman (not a corpse-man as some recent somewhat fanatical president would say), and I can tell you many stories of Marines and Sailors who maintained restrictive diets (aka picky eaters). Most obvious was lack of sustaining energy (hypoglycemia) at mile 15 (with 80lbs of gear including a 6.5lb rifle and 200 rnds of ammo, etc.) and depletion of essential vitamins, electrolyte imbalance. They were always the first to collapse and have to hear me scold “see I told you so.” An IV of D5W usually does the trick (D is for dextrose, OMG!)
A ketogenic diet — which is very low in net carbohydrates and high in healthy fats — is key for boosting mitochondrial function. Healthy fats also play an important role in maintaining your body's electrical system. When your body is able to burn fat for fuel, your liver creates water-soluble fats called ketones that burn far more efficiently than carbs, thereby creating fewer reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secondary free radicals. Ketones also decrease inflammation, improve glucose metabolism and aid the building of muscle mass. The benefits of a cyclical ketogenic diet are detailed in my latest bestselling book, "Fat for Fuel." While the book was peer-reviewed by over a dozen health experts and scientists, a new large-scale international study (known as the international Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology, or PURE, study) adds further weight to the premise that high intakes of healthy fats — especially saturated fats — boost health and longevity.
It's important to keep in mind that when you are on a low-carb diet of any type, you will lose several pounds in the first few days. That's because your body is dropping water weight. When I returned to typical eating over the wedding weekend, I gained 4 pounds. I didn't overeat that weekend. I had just returned to eating carbs, so the water weight returned.
Seasonings and sauces are a tricky part of ketogenic diet foods, but people use them on a regular basis to add flavor to their meals. The easiest way to remain strict here is to avoid processed foods. There are many low carb condiments and products on the market, and there’s no way to list them all. A handful of them are great, but the majority use high glycemic index sweeteners – which you want to avoid.
“I am a physician with type 1 diabetes. I have been using a low-carb, ketogenic diet to treat my own diabetes for the past 16 years. Evidence shows that low-carb diets are safe and effective. With the potential to reverse type 2 diabetes, control type 1 diabetes and even stop, slow down, or reverse complications, a low-carb diet can be life changing. Diet Doctor provides the most accurate and relevant materials for a healthy, easy and fun low-carb experience.”

First, a little background: Eric Westman, MD, director of the Duke Lifestyle Medical Clinic, explained to Health in a previous interview that in order to successfully follow the keto diet, you need to eat moderate amounts of protein, reduce your carb intake, and increase fats. When you reduce your carb consumption, your body turns to stored fat as its new fuel source—a process called ketosis. To stay in ketosis, followers of the keto diet must limit their carbs to 50 grams a day, Dr. Westman says.

Participants completed take-home food records (4 consecutive days, including a weekend) collected at baseline and at weeks 2, 8, and 16 during the study. Participants were given handouts with examples of how to complete the records. A registered dietician analyzed the food records using a nutrition software program (Food Processor SQL, ESHA Research, Inc., Salem, OR).
Keep an eye on your intake for nut or seed based foods, as they can be quite high in inflammatory omega 6’s. These include items like almonds, walnuts, pine nuts, sunflower oil and corn oil. Eating fatty fish and animal meat, keeping snacking to a minimum, and not over-indulging in dessert items that are dense in almond flour is usually enough to keep your omega’s at normal ranges.
As of 2016 it was unclear whether low-carbohydrate dieting had any beneficial effect on cardiovascular health, though such diets can cause high LDL cholesterol levels, which carry a risk of atherosclerosis in the long term.[9] Potential favorable changes in triglyceride and HDL cholesterol values should be weighed against potential unfavorable changes in LDL and total cholesterol values.[31]

This book is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, duplication, adaptation, distribution, and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, a link is provided to the Creative Commons license, and any changes made are indicated.
Net carbs is simply total carbs minus fiber and non-digestible sugar alcohols, like erythritol. (This doesn’t apply to high glycemic sugar alcohols, like maltitol.) We don’t have to count fiber and certain sugar alcohols in net carbs, because they either don’t get broken down by our bodies, are not absorbed, or are absorbed but not metabolized. (Read more about sugar alcohols here.)
Sleep enough – for most people at least seven hours per night on average – and keep stress under control. Sleep deprivation and stress hormones raise blood sugar levels, slowing ketosis and weight loss a bit. Plus they might make it harder to stick to a keto diet, and resist temptations. So while handling sleep and stress will not get you into ketosis on it’s own, it’s still worth thinking about.

At 469 pounds I restricted myself to a daily calorie intake between 1k-1.5k a day. Often I would even go down to 800 (not advocating this!). Well, i'm still alive today, down a ton of weight and I restrict myself to about 1.5-2k per day now. As others said, calorie restriction is required to lose, but generally speaking I just go by how I feel. If im full of energy, feeling great and not hitting my calories it's not really a big deal to me.

Eating out while going keto can be tricky. Planning ahead helps you know where your next snacks and meals will come from, so you aren’t tempted to reach for an easy—high-carb—fix, like fast food. Each week, plan out everything from meals to snacks and if you’re using an app, go ahead and fill in your estimated macronutrients ahead of time. This will help you get an idea of your overall intake, so you can make adjustments to reach your daily goals more easily. Get started by planning to make these 10 keto recipes so good you’ll never know you’re on a diet.

Participants met with researchers 10 times over a four-month period. During 4 of the 10 visits, researchers analyzed participants’ blood and body fat for changes in body weight, hormones, ketone bodies (which are produced during ketosis), and muscle losses. After 60 to 90 days, participants were gradually taken off ketosis and placed on a low-calorie diet consisting of between 800 and 1,500 calories per day, and then a maintenance diet consisting of 1,500 and 2,000 calories, depending on the participant. Out of the 20 participants enrolled in the study, 12 completed the regimen and lost about 44.5 pounds each.
Yeah so there definitely is a sweet spot for maintaining ketosis and the weight loss benfits(via body getting energy by burning fat for ketones and fatty acids as opposed to carbohydrates for glycogen.) yet still consuming enough carbs where you aren’t suffering from malnutrition or whatever it is that’s causing your fatigue every afternoon. Their are are couple ways to find and ride within this “golden” range. Possibly easiest is to take some coconut oil or similar high fat, high calorie, medium chain triglyceride supplement. This will likely ensure sufficient caloric intake and you can also eat more carbs while maintaing a sufficient fat:carb ratio to remain in ketosis. I hesitate to toss out a number but maybe 40-50g net carbs per day will be okay as long as your taking the supplement. Another way(the one I’d probably reccomend) is to slowly increase your carb intake 5g / day / week. As you do this continue to test ketone levels in the pee to determine at which amount of carbs per day you slip out of ketosis then just eat a little less carbs per day then that number. This is best because it requires no supplement, you’ll learn more about your body, and it will lower ketone levels which, although good for the brain in smaller amounts, in large amounts WILL cause ketoacidosis and raise the bloods Ph in which can cause kidney stones via bone demineralization along with a whole host of other complications including coma (likely one of the reasons you’ve been feeling crappy-too many ketones) third: eat the amount of carbs just above your ketosis inducing threshold level, you’ll still likely lose weight because even at carb levels just above ketosis range you’ll still experience less hunger sensations(a benefit of burning ketones and fatty acids for energy and not glycogen) and so eat less. I hope you find this helpful. *note: I am not a medical professional this information is the result of personal curiosity and independent reaearch.
As an addiction specialist, I recommend Diet Doctor as a resource for my patients, many of whom are addicted to sugar. Diet Doctor offers recipes that are delicious and remove the addictive elements from food. I encourage high-fat and low-carb food plans only – because they work: You can lose weight, keep it off and be free from food obsession. Freedom tastes great!”
Weight loss is a common target for disease management, as well as health promotion. The prevalence of obesity remains high among U.S. adults (36.5%) (5), as well as children and adolescents (17%) (6). Importantly, obesity is a significant contributor to increased morbidity and mortality, as well as being a primary driver of increasing medical expenses (4). Despite much effort and cost, there has been little success on this front and obesity remains a public health crisis.
It starts with limiting carbohydrate intake to just 20–30 net grams per day. “Net carbs” describes the amount of carbs remaining once dietary fiber is taken into account. Because fiber is indigestible once consumed, simply don’t count grams of fiber toward their daily carb allotment. So that means subtracting grams of fiber from total carb games, to give you the total net carbs.
19. Soejima E., Ohki T., Kurita Y., Yuan X., Tanaka K., Kakino S., Hara K., Nakayama H., Tajiri Y., Yamada K. Protective effect of 3-hydroxybutyrate against endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated vascular endothelial cell damage induced by low glucose exposure. PLoS ONE. 2018;13:e0191147. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0191147. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
d) Or does the entire question revert back to a classic calorie counting exercise? In this case, I’ll eat the minimum amount of protein that is needed to prevent my muscles from being cannibalized (for energy) and for the rest, I’ll limit my dietary fat intake per day to a level, where its energy + energy currently obtained from adipose tissue match my total energy need? (I’ll leave gluconeogenesis out of this equation for simplicity.) If this is the case, I’ll lose adipose tissue, i.e. lose weight, but the interesting question still remains: How much energy can my body extract from the adipose tissue at its best? How can I maximize the share of energy coming from adipose tissue instead of dietary fat?
2. Choose the amount of protein based on your activity level. For instance, I weigh about 130 pounds and exercise (spin, hike, yoga, weight training) about six or more hours per week. Applying the keto calculator, if I want to lose weight, I should eat 20 grams of carbs, 67 grams of protein, and the rest in fat (about 119 grams). Here are my typical proteins in a day. (If you exercise more than me, you’ll need more.)
Low-calorie diets leading to rapid weight loss can cause headaches -- especially if your carbohydrate intake is too low. A study published in 2011 in the "Nutrition Journal" reports that symptoms of ketosis, which occurs when there is a buildup of metabolic byproducts called ketones in the body after breaking down fat instead of carbs as fuel -- include headaches, bad breath, weakness and constipation. To reduce your chance of getting a headache during weight loss, eat at least 130 grams of carbohydrates -- which is the recommended dietary allowance, or RDA -- daily and avoid losing more than 2 pounds per week.

–Make healthy breakfast fun with these little low carb blueberry pancake dippers. They're easy enough to make on a weekday morning! This post is sponsored by Wyman's. Do you get into a breakfast rut? You wake up, wander to the kitchen, grab a cup of coffee and think...same old same old. You could have eggs...again. Or you could have a low carb muffin...again. Maybe you have some low carb bread on hand for toast...again. Whatever your breakfast routine, you're sick of it and you want something different. Yep, this happens in my house too, with relative frequency.All Day I Dream About Food

It was recently reported that the consumption of diets with low percentages of carbohydrates over a long period of time (>25 years) are associated with higher mortality [63]. This association was mitigated when the substitutions were plant-based [63]. In the current study, patients were exposed to a low carbohydrate intake during less than 90 days and the source of carbohydrate was from vegetables. Moreover, the strong weight loss induced a decrease in the burden of obesity-related disease [6]. Thus, the strength of the current study is reinforced with the consistence of the results with that of previous research, regardless of the strong dietary energy restrictions induced by a VLCK diet.


Wilder's colleague, paediatrician Mynie Gustav Peterman, later formulated the classic diet, with a ratio of one gram of protein per kilogram of body weight in children, 10–15 g of carbohydrate per day, and the remainder of calories from fat. Peterman's work in the 1920s established the techniques for induction and maintenance of the diet. Peterman documented positive effects (improved alertness, behaviour, and sleep) and adverse effects (nausea and vomiting due to excess ketosis). The diet proved to be very successful in children: Peterman reported in 1925 that 95% of 37 young patients had improved seizure control on the diet and 60% became seizure-free. By 1930, the diet had also been studied in 100 teenagers and adults. Clifford Joseph Barborka, Sr., also from the Mayo Clinic, reported that 56% of those older patients improved on the diet and 12% became seizure-free. Although the adult results are similar to modern studies of children, they did not compare as well to contemporary studies. Barborka concluded that adults were least likely to benefit from the diet, and the use of the ketogenic diet in adults was not studied again until 1999.[10][14] 

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“[This study] does support other existing research findings that you can indeed lose weight on a ketogenic-inducing diet, and higher levels of protein intake, while following a calorie-restricted diet does help preserve the loss of lean muscle mass,” says Lona Sandon, PhD, RDN, assistant professor in the department of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.
Low-calorie diets leading to rapid weight loss can cause headaches -- especially if your carbohydrate intake is too low. A study published in 2011 in the "Nutrition Journal" reports that symptoms of ketosis, which occurs when there is a buildup of metabolic byproducts called ketones in the body after breaking down fat instead of carbs as fuel -- include headaches, bad breath, weakness and constipation. To reduce your chance of getting a headache during weight loss, eat at least 130 grams of carbohydrates -- which is the recommended dietary allowance, or RDA -- daily and avoid losing more than 2 pounds per week.
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