Look, the good doctor is right – he only forgot to stress “portion control” which is why many fanatical dieters are so kee-jerk reactive to any discussion – odds are you over ate like a hog before your keto diet, and are weak and insecure in your diet plans. Eat EVERYTHING in small amounts, and you will live long and prosper. The only thing to avoid are processed foods. Cook your meals from scratch using quality ingredients.
When you’re on a ketogenic diet, fatty acids are released from your body fat and insulin levels decrease. When insulin levels decrease, your kidneys will excrete more water (you’ll notice an increase in the frequency of trips to the bathroom), sodium and potassium. As a result, your blood pressure can plummet. Dizziness, fatigue and sudden weakness are symptoms of low blood pressure. Leg cramps may also occur from dehydration.
Helps to control type 2 diabetes and other metabolic disorders: If you have diabetes, you may be turning to the ketogenic diet as a way to control your insulin and glucose levels. Early research shows that the ketogenic diet can help you significantly improve insulin sensitivity levels (11). One study even shows that some diabetes patients were able to stop taking their diabetes medication altogether while on the keto diet (12)!
Hi, I had a gastric bypass 8yrs ago. I’m doing the keto diet with my 16yr old son to help him lose weight and I’ve also put on 20lbs back that I’m trying to get rid off. So far we’ve lost 6lbs in 4weeks. Since I can only eat a little portion at a time and it’s hard to consume the 75% fats to get into a Ketosis stage, although I’m trying really hard but it’s impossible. Can you recommend ways to booster my fat intakes pls. Or other ways to get in to Ketosis. Thank you for all this info you’ve shared by the way.
Yeah so there definitely is a sweet spot for maintaining ketosis and the weight loss benfits(via body getting energy by burning fat for ketones and fatty acids as opposed to carbohydrates for glycogen.) yet still consuming enough carbs where you aren’t suffering from malnutrition or whatever it is that’s causing your fatigue every afternoon. Their are are couple ways to find and ride within this “golden” range. Possibly easiest is to take some coconut oil or similar high fat, high calorie, medium chain triglyceride supplement. This will likely ensure sufficient caloric intake and you can also eat more carbs while maintaing a sufficient fat:carb ratio to remain in ketosis. I hesitate to toss out a number but maybe 40-50g net carbs per day will be okay as long as your taking the supplement. Another way(the one I’d probably reccomend) is to slowly increase your carb intake 5g / day / week. As you do this continue to test ketone levels in the pee to determine at which amount of carbs per day you slip out of ketosis then just eat a little less carbs per day then that number. This is best because it requires no supplement, you’ll learn more about your body, and it will lower ketone levels which, although good for the brain in smaller amounts, in large amounts WILL cause ketoacidosis and raise the bloods Ph in which can cause kidney stones via bone demineralization along with a whole host of other complications including coma (likely one of the reasons you’ve been feeling crappy-too many ketones) third: eat the amount of carbs just above your ketosis inducing threshold level, you’ll still likely lose weight because even at carb levels just above ketosis range you’ll still experience less hunger sensations(a benefit of burning ketones and fatty acids for energy and not glycogen) and so eat less. I hope you find this helpful. *note: I am not a medical professional this information is the result of personal curiosity and independent reaearch.
The most common and relatively minor short-term side effects of ketogenic diet include a collection of symptoms like nausea, vomiting, headache, fatigue, dizziness, insomnia, difficulty in exercise tolerance, and constipation, sometimes referred to as keto flu. These symptoms resolve in a few days to few weeks. Ensuring adequate fluid and electrolyte intake can help counter some of these symptoms. Long-term adverse effects include hepatic steatosis, hypoproteinemia, kidney stones, and vitamin and mineral deficiencies.
“After years of practicing Family & Sports Medicine, I’ve recognized that preventing and addressing my patients’ dietary metabolic issues are the foundation upon which quality medical and musculoskeletal care are built. LCHF principles produced such remarkable results in my patients that I completely redefined my scope of practice and developed a unique Lifestyle Medicine Program that synergistically complements my Sports Medicine & Non-Surgical Orthopedics specialty practice. I truly care for the whole person. Diet Doctor is an exceptional, comprehensive resource for lay persons and clinicians; I recommend it to all my patients and colleagues.”
Finally, the accuracy of MF-BIA and ADP in the estimation of body composition was studied in relation to DXA. As shown in Table 2, the unadjusted regression coefficients for FM, FM%, and FFM were consistently higher with MF-BIA in comparison with ADP throughout the study. Specifically, regression coefficients for MF-BIA were high (r2 > 0.8) for FM and FFM, whereas those regression coefficients for FM% were slightly lower (r2 > 0.7). However, most of the regression coefficients using ADP were lower (r2 < 0.7) for FM, FM%, and FFM. A similar pattern was observed when adjusting for age and sex. The regression coefficients for both MF-BIA and ADP decreased with weight loss.
Yancy WS Jr, Westman EC, McDuffie JR, Grambow SC, Jeffreys AS, Bolton J, Chalecki A, Oddone EZ, “A randomized trial of a low-carbohydrate diet vs orlistat plus a lowfat diet for weight loss,” Arch Intern Med. 2010 Jan 25;170(2):136-45. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20101008?itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=2.

“As an interventional cardiologist for 30 years —and an avid runner and active person — I realized as I aged that eating less and moving more did not work for me or for my patients. The ketogenic diet resulted in a 30-pound weight loss and a dramatic increase in energy. As a past president of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, I have been urged by medical colleagues to share my ketogenic knowledge widely. With my wife, a certified health coach, I have established a cardiometabolic clinic for obesity and insulin resistance syndromes. One of the resources we recommend is Diet Doctor.”

“I have been staying informed about therapeutic nutrition, diabetes reversal, and the role of diet in optimal metabolic health, and I am also practicing a low-carbohydrate diet. I do not believe in a one-size-fits-all approach to diet; what works for one person may not work for another. As a physician, I am very interested in the possibilities that good nutrition can bring to lifelong health.”
But what about body fat? Hall and Guo investigated 20 controlled feeding studies that reported changes in body fatness on equal-calorie diets differing in fat and carbohydrate content. They found that each diet has similar effects on body fatness, which makes sense when you consider the finding that neither diet provides a significant metabolic advantage.   (Yet higher-carbohydrate diets seem to cause a slightly more substantial loss of body fat per calorie — a 16 gram per day difference.)

Fats: When it comes to types of fat to consume, anything goes. It’s recommended that you consume a mixture of saturated and monounsaturated fats. Things like coconut oil, which contains medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) help keep ketone levels high. So long as you’re keeping your carbs in check, if you want to go as far as swigging bacon grease to get your fat in, you won’t be the first.


Regarding higher-carbohydrate diets, 20 studies reported higher energy expenditure, and this increase in energy expenditure was statistically significant in 14 of those studies. Overall, the evidence suggests that the carbohydrate and fat content of the diet has little impact on energy expenditure. In other words, low-carb diets do not have a significant metabolic advantage like many insulin theory proponents believe.
Hi Gigi, Low carb and keto is about the balance of macronutrients eaten (fat, protein and carbs), not specifically meat or lack thereof. Most people on keto do eat meat, though some people do vegetarian keto. Fat is actually necessary for many body processes. There is no issue for the kidneys with a high fat diet, but if you eat too much protein that isn’t great for the kidneys. It’s a common misconception that keto is high protein (it isn’t). Keto is great for diabetics as it naturally helps stabilize insulin. All of this being said, please know I’m not a doctor and you should consult your doctor on any medical questions or before starting any diet. If you have more questions that aren’t medical questions, I recommend our low carb & keto support group here.
Gary D. Foster, Ph.D., Holly R. Wyatt, M.D., James O. Hill, Ph.D., Brian G. McGuckin, Ed.M., Carrie Brill, B.S., B. Selma Mohammed, M.D., Ph.D., Philippe O. Szapary, M.D., Daniel J. Rader, M.D., Joel S. Edman, D.Sc., and Samuel Klein, M.D., “A Randomized Trial of a Low-Carbohydrate Diet for Obesity — NEJM,” N Engl J Med 2003; 348:2082- 2090. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa022207.
“I prescribe ketogenic whole-foods diets because they are powerful metabolic interventions with the potential to address root causes of psychiatric disorders, including inflammation, oxidation, and insulin resistance. I enthusiastically recommend the Diet Doctor website to all my patients because it is the most comprehensive resource for low-carb news, advice, science, inspiration and support in the world. The information there is trustworthy, easy to understand, available in multiple formats and languages, and funded entirely by the people.”
The nutritional intervention was based on a commercial weight-loss program (PNK method®), as was described elsewhere [4]. Briefly, the intervention included an evaluation by the specialist physician conducting the study, an assessment by an expert dietician, and exercise recommendations. This method is based on high-biological-value protein preparations obtained from cow’s milk, soy, avian eggs, green peas, and cereals. Each protein preparation contained 15 g protein, 4 g carbohydrates, 3 g fat, and 50 mg docohexaenoic acid and provided 90–100 kcal.
The keto diet works for such a high percentage of people because it targets several key, underlying causes of weight gain — including hormonal imbalances, especially insulin resistance coupled with high blood sugar levels, and the cycle of restricting and “binging” on empty calories due to hunger that so many dieters struggle with. In fact, these are some of the direct benefits of the keto diet.
The original therapeutic diet for paediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories[Note 1] to maintain the correct weight for age and height. The classic therapeutic ketogenic diet was developed for treatment of paediatric epilepsy in the 1920s and was widely used into the next decade, but its popularity waned with the introduction of effective anticonvulsant medications. This classic ketogenic diet contains a 4:1 ratio by weight of fat to combined protein and carbohydrate. This is achieved by excluding high-carbohydrate foods such as starchy fruits and vegetables, bread, pasta, grains, and sugar, while increasing the consumption of foods high in fat such as nuts, cream, and butter.[1] Most dietary fat is made of molecules called long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). However, medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs)—made from fatty acids with shorter carbon chains than LCTs—are more ketogenic. A variant of the classic diet known as the MCT ketogenic diet uses a form of coconut oil, which is rich in MCTs, to provide around half the calories. As less overall fat is needed in this variant of the diet, a greater proportion of carbohydrate and protein can be consumed, allowing a greater variety of food choices.[4][5]
“As a full-spectrum family physician since 2004, luckily I stumbled on the wonderful low-carb community two years ago after my amazing wife was forced to make dietary changes after surgery. I’ve never looked back! After transforming my own health, with help from resources like Diet Doctor, Jimmy Moore, and Dr. Jason Fung, I’ve committed to bettering the lives of my patients with intensive dietary management through LCHF and intermittent fasting. Empowering patients to make these lifestyle changes has truly brought back the joy of medicine for me. I am so thankful to all who have inspired me along the way.”
The popular belief that high-fat diets cause obesity and several other diseases such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cancer has not been observed in recent epidemiological studies. Studies carried out in animals that were fed high-fat diets did not show a specific causal relationship between dietary fat and obesity. On the contrary, very-low-carbohydrate and high-fat diets such as the ketogenic diet have shown to beneficial to weight loss.
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