I’ve been on WFPB diet for 8 months because of high chloresterol and it didn’t drop any, but my husband did the diet with me and his went way down. I have decided to try low carb diet for the next 3 months and do labs to see if it helps. Then I might try keto after that, but between doing WFPB and low carb, I like WFPB best! My doctor said my chloresterol might be “genes”! Loved reading about different diets! I may just need pills or have high chloresterol! Nancy
On the ketogenic diet, carbohydrates are restricted and so cannot provide for all the metabolic needs of the body. Instead, fatty acids are used as the major source of fuel. These are used through fatty-acid oxidation in the cell's mitochondria (the energy-producing parts of the cell). Humans can convert some amino acids into glucose by a process called gluconeogenesis, but cannot do this by using fatty acids.[57] Since amino acids are needed to make proteins, which are essential for growth and repair of body tissues, these cannot be used only to produce glucose. This could pose a problem for the brain, since it is normally fuelled solely by glucose, and most fatty acids do not cross the blood–brain barrier. However, the liver can use long-chain fatty acids to synthesise the three ketone bodies β-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate and acetone. These ketone bodies enter the brain and partially substitute for blood glucose as a source of energy.[56]
An important strength of this study was the use of 3 different techniques for determining body composition in different settings, i.e., obesity and no ketosis, marked reduction in body weight with high ketosis, and finally, substantial reduction in body weight without ketosis. The tight control of adherence by daily measurement of B-OHB is another relevant strength of this work. A potential limitation of our study could be the sample size; however, because each subject underwent 4 evaluations, enabling each individual subject’s own results to be compared, this adds statistical power to the study and a real difference between the experimental points.
Despite the efforts to decrease weight loss, obesity prevalence is increasing worldwide [36]. The obesogenic environment and the unsuccessful effect of current treatments are consistently contributing to an increase in obesity prevalence. Obesity is promoted by several factors, including genetic, environmental, metabolic, and behavioral factors [8,11,37]. These same factors are involved in the unsuccessful effect of many weight-loss therapies [38]. Apart from the biochemical and genetic factors, in the literature, obesity has consistently been related with a poorer quality of life [39] and lower self-esteem and lower life satisfaction [40]. Additionally, food addiction was proposed as a plausible causal factor contributing to obesity and weight regain after a weight-loss therapy, at least in the same individuals [41]. Therefore, it is important to control these factors to attain success in weight-loss therapy. In this context, a VLCK diet has previously been shown to induce severe body-weight loss that has been maintained for at least 2 years after dieting [6]. This nutritional weight-loss method resulted in the beneficial effects of decreasing body fat mass by preserving body muscle mass and strength [4] and maintaining the resting metabolic rate [7]. Thus, the new open question was whether the beneficial effects of this nutritional method on body composition and energy metabolism are associated with a modulation in the psychobiological phenomena of obese patients.
“As a bariatric surgeon and as a researcher studying the liver for two decades, my research has shown that it is the toxicity of chronic excessive carbohydrate consumption that is the primary cause of obesity and obesity-related co-morbidities. As an obese doctor myself, I was able to lose 90 pounds once I recognized that I had a carbohydrate addiction and so eliminated carbohydrates from my diet. While I have performed more than 8,000 bariatric surgeries, I firmly believe that surgery is only a tool. Obesity and diabetes are not treated by surgery, but rather by the journey to become carbohydrate-free.”

Instead of making your own cereal, you can always have a low-carb alternative. Try out chia seed pudding, flax granola sprinkled into coconut or almond milk, salted caramel pork rind cereal, or just mix together toasted nuts that are crushed and crispy. It’s quite easy to find a crunchy alternative to cereal (or just a low-carb replacement in general) so keep on the lookout and experiment for yourself to see which you like best.
You work out for a few months and get in shape and fall back to the old habits because you were not conditioned mentally, only physically. Physical fitness is only a part of journey, fitness is over 75% percent mental. Gyms, nutritionists, and personal trainers give most people a temporary Band-Aid but never address the actual issue. The 3-Week Ketogenic Diet includes secret mindset strategies to make your journey so much easier.
"Obese. That's what the doc said. He said if I didn't change I'd be Morbidly Obese. So stopped eating big macs and started out by walking. But it wasn't really enough to undo the damage. Then I found on Shark Tank. So I found it online and ordered it. I figured, it was worth a shot. I'm glad I did. It jumpstarted my weight loss! I started shedding the weight. I'm down 60 pounds after just 9 months! Thank you - you really saved my life!"
Yes you can lose fat on a low carb because it’s just another low calorie diet. How do I know this? I’ve done low carb, (Atkins, etc) high carb, (Slimming Word) moderate carb etc and log my food and was shocked each time to see they were all low calorie. After the initial week or so the rate of fat loss is same as any other diet. It’s calories in calories out. Simple. It’s what some call indirect deficit diet placing silly restriction, rules can eat must eat etc. and of course you lose weight but nothing to do with low carb. It works because it’s a low calorie diet.
No diet plan fits all and not everybody can follow a very low-carb diet. Even Dr Volek and Dr Phinney noted that there is not enough evidence that a very low-carb diet (such as less than 20 g net carbs) is beneficial for those with preexisting thyroid or adrenal conditions. Dr. Broda Barnes, who spent over 50 years on thyroid research, suggested in his book “Hypothyroidism: The Unsuspected Illness”, that the minimum amount of carbohydrate intake for patients with hypothyroidism should be at least 30 grams of net carbs.
A survey in 2005 of 88 paediatric neurologists in the US found that 36% regularly prescribed the diet after three or more drugs had failed, 24% occasionally prescribed the diet as a last resort, 24% had only prescribed the diet in a few rare cases, and 16% had never prescribed the diet. Several possible explanations exist for this gap between evidence and clinical practice.[34] One major factor may be the lack of adequately trained dietitians, who are needed to administer a ketogenic diet programme.[31]
^ Davies MJ, D'Alessio DA, Fradkin J, Kernan WN, Mathieu C, Mingrone G, et al. (2018). "Management of Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes, 2018. A Consensus Report by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD)". Diabetes Care. 41 (12): 2669–2701. doi:10.2337/dci18-0033. PMC 6245208. PMID 30291106. Low-carbohydrate, low glycemic index, and high-protein diets, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet all improve glycemic control, but the effect of the Mediterranean eating pattern appears to be the greatest
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