Previous studies have shown that ketogenic diets preferably reduce the total FM in obese patients (10–13). However, the precise distribution of these losses has not been determined. In this study we confirmed that the diet reduces total FM and specifically visceral adipose tissue, which has a greater impact in predicting cardiometabolic complications associated with obesity than does the total volume of body adiposity (2, 31).

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We have solid evidence showing that a ketogenic diet reduces seizures in children, sometimes as effectively as medication. Because of these neuroprotective effects, questions have been raised about the possible benefits for other brain disorders such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis, sleep disorders, autism, and even brain cancer. However, there are no human studies to support recommending ketosis to treat these conditions.
The American Academy of Family Physicians defines low-carbohydrate diets as diets that restrict carbohydrate intake to 20 to 60 grams per day, typically less than 20% of caloric intake.[2] A 2016 review of low-carbohydrate diets classified diets with 50g of carbohydrate per day (less than 10% of total calories) as "very low" and diets with 40% of calories from carbohydrates as "mild" low-carbohydrate diets.[18] In a 2015 review Richard D. Feinman and colleagues proposed that a very low carbohydrate diet had less that 10% caloric intake from carbohydrate, a low carbohydrate diet less than 26%, a medium carbohydrate diet less than 45%, and a high carbohydrate diet more than 45%.[16]
Studies have shown that people losing weight with a low-carbohydrate diet, compared to a low-fat diet, have very slightly more weight loss initially, equivalent to approximately 100kcal/day, but that the advantage diminishes over time and is ultimately insignificant.[6] The Endocrine Society state that "when calorie intake is held constant [...] body-fat accumulation does not appear to be affected by even very pronounced changes in the amount of fat vs carbohydrate in the diet."[6]
When you’re on keto, you’re less hungry. Ketones help control hormones that influence appetite.[2] They suppress ghrelin, your “hunger hormone,” and at the same time they boost cholecystokinin (CCK) — the hormone that keeps you feeling full.[3] You won’t want to snack as regularly, making it easier to go longer without food. Your body will then reach into its fat stores for energy. The result? More weight loss. Learn more here about how the keto diet suppresses appetite.
“I started a low-carb, high-fat diet for myself in an attempt to treat my own health problems. Since then, I have seen significant health benefits not only in myself but also in many of my patients using a LCHF/ketogenic approach. Diet Doctor gives a simple but very effective evidence-based resource that I confidently recommend to all my patients. And the recipes are great!”
But your heart health might depend on what you actually eat. Research published in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that low-carb diets based mostly on plant sources of fat and protein (like avocados or nuts) can lower heart disease risk by 30 percent. But those benefits didn’t hold for people who ate mostly animal-based proteins and fats. (Think: bacon, butter, and steak.)
As ingested CHO is broken down by the stomach and absorbed through the small intestine, rising blood sugar creates a feedback loop which results in secretion of insulin. The primary role of insulin is to “dispose” of excess blood sugar by signaling tissues to “uptake” more glucose from the circulating supply. In this manner insulin serves a prominent role in glucose regulation. This concept also provides the basis for the glycemic index, a concept which attempts to quantify the impact CHO foods have on blood sugar response. For example, foods rich in simple CHO (i.e., “sugars”), which are absorbed quickly, trigger a rapid rise in blood sugar (and subsequently insulin response), whereas foods rich in complex CHO, such as fiber-rich legumes, exert a relatively blunted response on blood glucose.

“I am a physician with type 1 diabetes. I have been using a low-carb, ketogenic diet to treat my own diabetes for the past 16 years. Evidence shows that low-carb diets are safe and effective. With the potential to reverse type 2 diabetes, control type 1 diabetes and even stop, slow down, or reverse complications, a low-carb diet can be life changing. Diet Doctor provides the most accurate and relevant materials for a healthy, easy and fun low-carb experience.”
The popular belief that high-fat diets cause obesity and several other diseases such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cancer has not been observed in recent epidemiological studies. Studies carried out in animals that were fed high-fat diets did not show a specific causal relationship between dietary fat and obesity. On the contrary, very-low-carbohydrate and high-fat diets such as the ketogenic diet have shown to beneficial to weight loss.
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