The accurate measurement of body composition changes is relevant to assess the contribution of the diet intervention, not only to total body weight but to the changes produced in FM, FFM, visceral fat tissue, and total body water (25, 27). To obtain such information, multicompartmental models that integrate information obtained from a single measurement (body density, total mineral mass, total body water) may be used to reduce the number of assumptions made on the stability of body characteristics (28). These models are of limited application in clinical practice, because they do not provide immediate results, are expensive, and require advanced analytical expertise (29, 30). For such reasons the 3 more widely used body composition analysis techniques were used in the present work. DXA is the most validated and commonly used technique to analyze body composition in obese patients and is based on the attenuation of a low-energy X-ray beam, depending on the tissue density and chemical composition. DXA is considered the gold standard technique by most groups working with body composition and was used as the reference method in the present work. Bioelectrical impedance techniques are low cost and readily available and rely on the use of population-specific equations to assess intracellular and extracellular water distribution. The MF-BIA system used in this study is a recently developed version that is not based on statistical population data and is capable of accurately assessing subjects with different body shapes and also obese subjects. Finally, ADP measures body density and is used more easily than other more complex systems for measuring body density, such as underwater weighing, and provides comparable results for obese subjects. Therefore, the use of 3 validated methods that use different principles was relevant for evaluating patients in different stages of a body weight reduction program.
“I prescribe ketogenic whole-foods diets because they are powerful metabolic interventions with the potential to address root causes of psychiatric disorders, including inflammation, oxidation, and insulin resistance. I enthusiastically recommend the Diet Doctor website to all my patients because it is the most comprehensive resource for low-carb news, advice, science, inspiration and support in the world. The information there is trustworthy, easy to understand, available in multiple formats and languages, and funded entirely by the people.”
The popular belief that high-fat diets cause obesity and several other diseases such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cancer has not been observed in recent epidemiological studies. Studies carried out in animals that were fed high-fat diets did not show a specific causal relationship between dietary fat and obesity. On the contrary, very-low-carbohydrate and high-fat diets such as the ketogenic diet have shown to beneficial to weight loss.
The keto diet works for such a high percentage of people because it targets several key, underlying causes of weight gain — including hormonal imbalances, especially insulin resistance coupled with high blood sugar levels, and the cycle of restricting and “binging” on empty calories due to hunger that so many dieters struggle with. In fact, these are some of the direct benefits of the keto diet.

Studies have shown that people losing weight with a low-carbohydrate diet, compared to a low-fat diet, have very slightly more weight loss initially, equivalent to approximately 100kcal/day, but that the advantage diminishes over time and is ultimately insignificant.[6] The Endocrine Society state that "when calorie intake is held constant [...] body-fat accumulation does not appear to be affected by even very pronounced changes in the amount of fat vs carbohydrate in the diet."[6]
As the popularity of the Keto Diet has exploded in recent years the true nature of Ketogenic weight loss has gotten blurred. So what is Keto? Very simply Keto refers to Ketosis, the state into which your body enters when it shifts to burning fat for energy instead of carbohydrates. As carbohydrates and sugar intake is restricted, your body begins to break down its fat stores to use as a source of energy. Therefore, the very basics of a Ketogenic Diet are:

Positive science on ketosis coupled with personal successes passed by word-of-mouth have driven more people to explore the ketogenic diet, says Volek. More recently, the keto diet hints at having a promising therapeutic role in cancer, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Research is still early in many areas, but Volek suspects there will more definitive answers on the wider scope of the diet’s benefits within the next decade.
The popular belief that high-fat diets cause obesity and several other diseases such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cancer has not been observed in recent epidemiological studies. Studies carried out in animals that were fed high-fat diets did not show a specific causal relationship between dietary fat and obesity. On the contrary, very-low-carbohydrate and high-fat diets such as the ketogenic diet have shown to beneficial to weight loss.
The classic ketogenic, or “keto,” diet calls for consuming a low amount of carbs, a high amount of fat, and a moderate amount of protein. But in the current study, participants induced ketosis by getting the majority of their calories from protein, a small amount from fat, and a low amount from carbs. One of the side effects of very low-calorie diets is loss of lean muscle mass, but on the adjusted keto diet in the study, participants preserved lean muscle mass. Researchers attributed the preservation of lean muscle mass to participants’ sustained RMR, and their results support those of a prior study, published in February 2017 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.
The Top 10 Things You Need to Know Before Going Keto: Thinking about giving the ketogenic diet a try? People are using it not only to lose weight, but to feel more energized, sleep better, and improve their mental focus. It’s not hype. The keto diet is a top health trend because it works. But before you go all in, here are the top 10 things you should know.
Many versions of ketogenic diets exist, but all ban carb-rich foods. Some of these foods may be obvious: starches from both refined and whole grains like breads, cereals, pasta, rice, and cookies; potatoes, corn, and other starchy vegetables; and fruit juices. Some that may not be so obvious are beans, legumes, and most fruits. Most ketogenic plans allow foods high in saturated fat, such as fatty cuts of meat, processed meats, lard, and butter, as well as sources of unsaturated fats, such as nuts, seeds, avocados, plant oils, and oily fish. Depending on your source of information, ketogenic food lists may vary and even conflict.
they are mistakes you should avoid such as eating too much protein 20 % is enough because of protein when it’s too much it will convert to glycogen and stored in your body. focus on potassium, sodium, and magnesium they are your friend in this type of diet if you don’t want to feel dizzy and get the keto flu. and what I suggest to you guys is to keep intensity in your training so you can adapt really fast and your body uses fat as a primary energy. they are really good cookbooks that can make things enjoyable and fun. I know eating the same things can make things harder but you can use cookbooks out there just type in google “keto diet cookbooks” or use this one I test it myself is great bit.ly/2lv0qA7
A ketogenic diet changes this. When you go keto, your body goes into ketosis, a glycogen-deprived state from the low carb intake. Instead, fat is oxidized to produce energy, resulting in ketones. Unlike glucose, which provides quick bursts of energy, the energy from fat burns slower. As a result, you may avoid sugar crashes right after a high-carb meal being on a keto diet.

^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Kossoff EH, Zupec-Kania BA, Amark PE, Ballaban-Gil KR, Bergqvist AG, Blackford R, et al. Optimal clinical management of children receiving the ketogenic diet: recommendations of the International Ketogenic Diet Study Group. Epilepsia. 2009 Feb;50(2):304–17. doi:10.1111/j.1528-1167.2008.01765.x. PMID 18823325


There is a lot of information out there on the ketogenic diet, and sometimes that abundance of information can be confusing!  Do you need to count macros? What are macros anyway?!?  How many carbs can I eat on the Keto Diet?  What is keto flu?  How do you get enough electrolytes in your Keto Diet to avoid cramps and other keto flu symptoms?  How much water should you drink?  Is diet soda ok on keto?  What foods are keto approved?  Will I gain the weight back after keto?  Is the Keto Diet safe? 

Dirty keto diet: “Dirty” is the apt term, as these version of keto follows the same strict percentages (75/20/5 of fat/protein/carbs) but rather than focusing on healthy versions of fat like coconut oil and wild salmon, you’re free to eat naughty but still keto friendly foods like bacon, sausage, pork rinds, diet sodas and even keto fast food. I do NOT recommend this.
All anthropometric measurements were undertaken after an overnight fast (8 to 10 hours), under resting conditions, in duplicate, and performed by well-trained health workers. Participants’ body weights were measured to the nearest 0.1 kg on the same calibrated electronic device (Seca 220 scale; Seca North America, Chino, CA), in underwear and without shoes. BMI was calculated by dividing body weight by the height squared [BMI = weight (kg)/height2 (m)]. Waist circumference was recorded with a standard flexible nonelastic metric tape at the middle point between the lower edge of the ribs and the iliac anterior spine. This measurement was made at the end of a normal expiration while the subject stood upright.
The primary outcome, hemoglobin A1c, decreased from 7.5 ± 1.4% at baseline to 6.3 ± 1.0% at week 16 (p < 0.001), a 1.2% absolute decrease and a 16% relative decrease (Table ​(Table4).4). All but two participants (n = 19 or 90%) had a decrease in hemoglobin A1c (Figure ​(Figure1).1). The absolute decrease in hemoglobin A1c was at least 1.0% in 11 (52%) participants. The relative decrease in hemoglobin A1c from baseline was greater than 10% in 14 (67%) participants, and greater than 20% in 6 (29%) participants. In regression analyses, the change in hemoglobin A1c was not predicted by the change in body weight, waist circumference, or percent body fat at 16 weeks (all p > 0.05).
^ Another publication of similar regimen was Hill LW, Eckman RS (1915). The Starvation Treatment of Diabetes with a series of graduated diets as used at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Boston: W.M. Leonard. This was so well received that it went into revised editions, eventually becomingThe Allen (Starvation) Treatment of Diabetes with a series of graduated diets (4th ed.). Boston. 1921. p. 140.
“I am amazed at what a low-carbohydrate diet can do in real life and in my oncology practice. I see many cases of difficult to treat cancers, and know full-well the limitations of conventional chemotherapy. When patients ask about the ketogenic diet and cancer, I point out our recently concluded clinical trial that showed the ketogenic diet to be safe in advanced cancer patients and possibly beneficial in improving quality of life and survival. The diet, together with regular cancer treatment, could be a win-win combination. Diet Doctor is a fabulous website, chock full of information!”

Thank you for the info.. I have lost 22 lbs in 6 1/2 weeks started Keto on Feb 27, 2019 and today is April 10, 2019..I lose every other day it seems with a couple times that I gained a lb and then lost it the next day.. I IF every couple days to see how long I can go but i do well with one big meal and a small one .or I have a loaded coffee with butter and heavy cream with Stevia in the morning.. I watch everything I can find to help me and I just happened on this.. My body loves me now that I am putting good food in it.. I have so much energy and feel so good.. I am 65 yrs young and want to live a lot longer only better .. Thanks again…

The ketogenic diet is not a benign, holistic, or natural treatment for epilepsy; as with any serious medical therapy, complications may result.[28] These are generally less severe and less frequent than with anticonvulsant medication or surgery.[28] Common but easily treatable short-term side effects include constipation, low-grade acidosis, and hypoglycaemia if an initial fast is undertaken. Raised levels of lipids in the blood affect up to 60% of children[38] and cholesterol levels may increase by around 30%.[28] This can be treated by changes to the fat content of the diet, such as from saturated fats towards polyunsaturated fats, and if persistent, by lowering the ketogenic ratio.[38] Supplements are necessary to counter the dietary deficiency of many micronutrients.[18]
“After years of practicing Family & Sports Medicine, I’ve recognized that preventing and addressing my patients’ dietary metabolic issues are the foundation upon which quality medical and musculoskeletal care are built. LCHF principles produced such remarkable results in my patients that I completely redefined my scope of practice and developed a unique Lifestyle Medicine Program that synergistically complements my Sports Medicine & Non-Surgical Orthopedics specialty practice. I truly care for the whole person. Diet Doctor is an exceptional, comprehensive resource for lay persons and clinicians; I recommend it to all my patients and colleagues.”
The liquid diets involved with VLCDs often bring on ketosis, a condition that involves a buildup of ketone bodies in the blood as well as urine. Ketones are a byproduct that is created when your body has to switch to fat as an energy source. It means your store of glycogen, or carbohydrates, has been depleted. One of the consequences of ketosis is a loss of appetite, which helps make it easier to follow a VLCD. Ketosis also causes you to shed excessive amounts of sodium, potassium and water, which can cause dehydration, sluggishness, constipation and gas. However, your body can adjust to changes in your electrolytes.
A recent systemic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the long-term effects (greater than 1 year) of dietary interventions on weight loss showed no sound evidence for recommending low-fat diets. In fact, low-carbohydrate diets led to significantly greater weight loss compared to low-fat interventions. It was observed that a carbohydrate-restricted diet is better than a low-fat diet for retaining an individual’s BMR. In other words, the quality of calories consumed may affect the number of calories burned. BMR dropped by more than 400 kcal/day on a low-fat diet when compared to a very low-carb diet.
Of the many benefits of a keto diet, weight loss is often considered No. 1., as it can often be substantial and happen quickly (especially for those who start out very overweight or obese). The 2013 study published in the British Journal of Nutrition found that those following a keto diet “achieved better long-term body weight and cardiovascular risk factor management when compared with individuals assigned to a conventional low-fat diet (i.e. a restricted-energy diet with less than 30 percent of energy from fat).” (2)
For those looking for something just a little closer to real sugar, you can use Xylitol. It cooks and tastes very similar to sugar, but it has a slight glycemic impact (13 vs. 100 for sugar). It is great, but please keep in mind that it is very toxic to animals and it will raise insulin levels slightly. These are the two most cited reasons for not using Xylitol.
1. Reduce carbs. How much? The short answer is to eat 20 to 25 grams each day for weight loss, and 25 to 30 for weight maintenance. (You must use a nutrition calculator for macronutrients to get it right because thinking in terms of grams is not intuitive, and nutritional ketosis is less likely to be successful if you try to “eyeball” the amounts.) The long answer is: it depends. I encourage people to limit carbs until they are in ketosis, as confirmed with a blood ketone meter (see below), and then try increasing the amount of carbs by 5 grams to see if they stay in ketosis.

Hi Martina thanks for sharing. I've been in keto for a good 2 years now. From 138lbs my weight is now at 118-120lbs and I am 5'4 ft 38 years old. I never felt better in my life since i decided to do keto. I really like that i can enjoy eating "Lechon" without the guilt. On the weekends i could do Cheatdays by drinking beer. Ketodiet is still new here in the Philippines, and alot of my friends are very skeptical about the diet. I will be sharing your blog and your story and hope that i could shed some enlightenment to my peers.
“I am amazed at what a low-carbohydrate diet can do in real life and in my oncology practice. I see many cases of difficult to treat cancers, and know full-well the limitations of conventional chemotherapy. When patients ask about the ketogenic diet and cancer, I point out our recently concluded clinical trial that showed the ketogenic diet to be safe in advanced cancer patients and possibly beneficial in improving quality of life and survival. The diet, together with regular cancer treatment, could be a win-win combination. Diet Doctor is a fabulous website, chock full of information!”
The insulin theory of obesity, in short, declares that the primary cause of obesity is higher carbohydrate diets because these diets increase insulin secretion more than any other diet. When insulin levels are high, fat storage will increase significantly and “starve” muscles and organs of energy.   This causes increased hunger and overeating that results in obesity.

First reported in 2003, the idea of using a form of the Atkins diet to treat epilepsy came about after parents and patients discovered that the induction phase of the Atkins diet controlled seizures. The ketogenic diet team at Johns Hopkins Hospital modified the Atkins diet by removing the aim of achieving weight loss, extending the induction phase indefinitely, and specifically encouraging fat consumption. Compared with the ketogenic diet, the modified Atkins diet (MAD) places no limit on calories or protein, and the lower overall ketogenic ratio (about 1:1) does not need to be consistently maintained by all meals of the day. The MAD does not begin with a fast or with a stay in hospital and requires less dietitian support than the ketogenic diet. Carbohydrates are initially limited to 10 g per day in children or 20 g per day in adults, and are increased to 20–30 g per day after a month or so, depending on the effect on seizure control or tolerance of the restrictions. Like the ketogenic diet, the MAD requires vitamin and mineral supplements and children are carefully and periodically monitored at outpatient clinics.[48]
Various mechanisms may explain the variations in body water. For example, glycogen depletion induced by VLCK diets could cause a marked increase in diuresis, given that glycogen is usually stored together with water (39, 40). Water loss might also be associated with ketonuria, because ketone bodies increase the renal sodium and water loss as a result (39, 41). These assumptions seem reasonable considering that the peak water loss coincides with the phase of maximum ketosis. However, the mechanisms explaining the diuresis observed with VLCK and with most hypocaloric diets are not known at present (30). Contrary to previous observations (42, 43), DXA analysis evidenced a maintenance in bone mineral density in the current study.
Cardiovascular workouts increase the heart rate for extended periods. If you are on the ketogenic diet, you might have difficulty finding energy reserves for cardio exercise. This is why the targeted keto diet can be effective. Right before working out, you load up on high-carbohydrate foods, which provide fuel to burn while exercising. During inactivity, your body burns fat. In periods of high intensity, such as aerobics, the body finds fuel from carbohydrates that can sustain the movement.
Gary D. Foster, Ph.D., Holly R. Wyatt, M.D., James O. Hill, Ph.D., Brian G. McGuckin, Ed.M., Carrie Brill, B.S., B. Selma Mohammed, M.D., Ph.D., Philippe O. Szapary, M.D., Daniel J. Rader, M.D., Joel S. Edman, D.Sc., and Samuel Klein, M.D., “A Randomized Trial of a Low-Carbohydrate Diet for Obesity — NEJM,” N Engl J Med 2003; 348:2082- 2090. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa022207.
The good news, however, is that following a well-formulated ketogenic diet should help increase HDL while lowering triglyceride levels. LDL will likely remain the same or potentially increase in order to efficiently transport triglycerides to cells to metabolize for energy. Again, LDL will likely become more of the pattern A type which is a highly beneficial shift.
Makes social gatherings harder. Dining out at restaurants will require more planning and research due to hidden carbs on restaurant menus. Attending birthday parties, weddings, and other social events will require more self-discipline. If you want to drink alcohol, you’ll have to limit yourself to one or two low-carb drinks. This means dry wines (the dryer the better!) and unflavored clear liquors, such as vodka, gin, and tequila. There are a surprisingly number of keto-friendly alcoholic beverages that won’t knock you out of ketosis. For dessert, dark chocolate (at least 70% cocoa) is okay in moderate amounts. Stick to keto-friendly chocolates that are naturally sweetened with zero-calorie sweeteners such as stevia and erythritol. You can have sugar-free candies on occasion, just be aware that the sugar alcohols may cause digestive discomfort if you have too much.
If you're doing everything else right but missing these elements, you'll stall your progress. Getting subpar sleep, not moving enough, and environmental toxins are among the factors that can stall weight loss even when you're vigilantly following a keto diet. What you eat matters, but how you live also dramatically affects weight loss. For many patients, dialing up sleep, reducing environmental and psychological stressors, and incorporating high-intensity burst training can be big needle movers to overcome plateaus.
Transformation Tuesday::: I wore shorts once last year, i felt good because they were a size 16 I think, down from a size 20. My size 2 shorts in the after picture are now too big. About a year between these pictures and at least 100lbs. I was working out, but @coach_jmo had just had the food conversation with me. It was vacation time and I was sad about not being beach ready in a little over 3 months. 😂 I was still making bad choices to help me cope with my weight gain from Postpartum depression and anxiety. I was still eating horribly, with cheat weekends and lots of pizza. 😂 I still thought exercising was enough to help me reach my goals. Working out 7 days a week with my trainer and a Ketogenic diet have changed my life. Down from a size 18/20 to a Size 0/2, over 130 pounds, and over 115 inches. 🎉🙌🎊 

Some negative side effects of a long-term ketogenic diet have been suggested, including increased risk of kidney stones and osteoporosis, and increased blood levels of uric acid (a risk factor for gout). Possible nutrient deficiencies may arise if a variety of recommended foods on the ketogenic diet are not included. It is important to not solely focus on eating high-fat foods, but to include a daily variety of the allowed meats, fish, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds to ensure adequate intakes of fiber, B vitamins, and minerals (iron, magnesium, zinc)—nutrients typically found in foods like whole grains that are restricted from the diet. Because whole food groups are excluded, assistance from a registered dietitian may be beneficial in creating a ketogenic diet that minimizes nutrient deficiencies.
Health Impact News has reported on many of the disease reversing results of the ketogenic (high fat-moderate protein-low carb) diet. Now, a new study is looking at the positive effects of gut bacteria among those following a ketogenic diet for epilepsy. Even though Johns Hopkins used a ketogenic diet for curing epilepsy over 80 years ago, when medical drugs did not help epilepsy effectively, mainstream medicine continues to rely on new and expensive toxic drugs for epileptic children. The “cocktail” combinations of pharmaceutical drugs prescribed often worsens childhood epilepsy. Health Impact News previously published a report on how a four year old child with refractory epilepsy (not treatable with pharmaceutical medications), was treated at the Rochester, Minnesota Mayo Clinic using a ketogenic diet. At first, the child was also kept on pharmaceuticals. The results were poor until he was taken off the medications; then he began healing completely. A new Chinese study on pediatric epileptic cases may even draw the attention of mainstream medical professionals, due to the results seen in children's gut microbiota structure when following a high-fat ketogenic diet.
Twenty-one of the 28 participants who were enrolled completed the study. Twenty participants were men; 13 were White, 8 were African-American. The mean [± SD] age was 56.0 ± 7.9 years and BMI was 42.2 ± 5.8 kg/m2. Hemoglobin A1c decreased by 16% from 7.5 ± 1.4% to 6.3 ± 1.0% (p < 0.001) from baseline to week 16. Diabetes medications were discontinued in 7 participants, reduced in 10 participants, and unchanged in 4 participants. The mean body weight decreased by 6.6% from 131.4 ± 18.3 kg to 122.7 ± 18.9 kg (p < 0.001). In linear regression analyses, weight change at 16 weeks did not predict change in hemoglobin A1c. Fasting serum triglyceride decreased 42% from 2.69 ± 2.87 mmol/L to 1.57 ± 1.38 mmol/L (p = 0.001) while other serum lipid measurements did not change significantly.
Protein: When people first reduce carbohydrates in their diets, it doesn't seem as though the amount of protein they eat is as important to ketosis as it often becomes later on. For example, people on the Atkins diet often eat fairly large amounts of protein in the early stages and remain in ketosis. However, over time, some (perhaps most) people need to be more careful about the amount of protein they eat as (anecdotally) the bodies of many people seem to "get better" at converting protein into glucose (gluconeogenesis). At that point, each individual needs to experiment to see if too much protein is throwing them out of ketosis and adjust as necessary.
If you’re looking to get a jump start on your health and fitness goals this year, you may be thinking about trying the ketogenic diet. Maybe you’ve heard the phrase before — it’s a huge diet buzzword — but aren’t sure what it means. Here’s a primer: The ketogenic diet is an eating plan that drives your body into ketosis, a state where the body uses fat as a primary fuel source (instead of carbohydrates), says Stacey Mattinson, RDN, who is based in Austin, Texas.
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