In 1863, William Banting, a formerly obese English undertaker and coffin maker, published "Letter on Corpulence Addressed to the Public", in which he described a diet for weight control giving up bread, butter, milk, sugar, beer, and potatoes.[46] His booklet was widely read, so much so that some people used the term "Banting" for the activity usually called "dieting".[47]
Much of the research into low-carbohydrate dieting has been of poor quality and studies which reported large effects have garnered disproportionate attention in comparison to those which are methodologically sound.[5] Higher quality studies tend to find no meaningful difference in outcome between low-fat and low-carbohydrate dieting.[5] Low-quality meta-analyses have tended to report favourably on the effect of low-carbohydrate diets: a systematic review found that 9 out of 10 meta-analyses with positive conclusions were affected by publication bias.[5]
I used an online keto calculator to set a goal for calories, carbs and fat. I mostly followed the suggestions, with the exception of fat. The calculator suggested over 200 grams of fat each day. That's tough to hit without loading ghee into my coffee or swigging some coconut oil before lunch. Can it be done? Absolutely. I just couldn't get there. For me, the focus was on reducing carbs. I let the other pieces just fall into place.
Hi Kim, there are several factors for developing autoimmune diseases, including Hashimoto's. I believe that in my case it was a combination of high-carb & low-calorie dieting that have contributed to it. I found out by accident because I went for allergy testing where they discovered I had thyroid antibodies. You should definitely avoid following a low-calorie diet (1000 kcal is not enough). Have a look at this tool: KetoDiet Buddy - Easy Macro Calculator for the Ketogenic Diet
Physicians of ancient Greece treated diseases, including epilepsy, by altering their patients' diet. An early treatise in the Hippocratic Corpus, On the Sacred Disease, covers the disease; it dates from c. 400 BC. Its author argued against the prevailing view that epilepsy was supernatural in origin and cure, and proposed that dietary therapy had a rational and physical basis.[Note 3] In the same collection, the author of Epidemics describes the case of a man whose epilepsy is cured as quickly as it had appeared, through complete abstinence of food and drink.[Note 4] The royal physician Erasistratus declared, "One inclining to epilepsy should be made to fast without mercy and be put on short rations."[Note 5] Galen believed an "attenuating diet"[Note 6] might afford a cure in mild cases and be helpful in others.[11]
“As a physician who developed type 1 diabetes in 1998 at the age of 38, I struggled to manage my blood sugar with conventional medical advice. I met Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt at a medical meeting in 2012 and have used Diet Doctor as an excellent source of information for both myself and my patients ever since. The low-carb diet resulted in a marked improvement in my blood sugar control and my entire outlook on life. I provide online coaching to people with diabetes who need individualized attention.”
The popular belief that high-fat diets cause obesity and several other diseases such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cancer has not been observed in recent epidemiological studies. Studies carried out in animals that were fed high-fat diets did not show a specific causal relationship between dietary fat and obesity. On the contrary, very-low-carbohydrate and high-fat diets such as the ketogenic diet have shown to beneficial to weight loss.

Hi Kim, there are several factors for developing autoimmune diseases, including Hashimoto's. I believe that in my case it was a combination of high-carb & low-calorie dieting that have contributed to it. I found out by accident because I went for allergy testing where they discovered I had thyroid antibodies. You should definitely avoid following a low-calorie diet (1000 kcal is not enough). Have a look at this tool: KetoDiet Buddy - Easy Macro Calculator for the Ketogenic Diet


Here’s the tricky part: There’s no definite answer for how much protein you’d have to eat before you run into trouble. “It really depends on how much protein a person is consuming versus how much they need, as well as the health of their kidneys at baseline,” Hultin says. That’s why it can be helpful to speak with a nutritionist or doctor who can help you tailor your diet before going keto.


Hi Sam, it won’t work. You will be incredibly hungry and you won’t have any energy. The idea of the keto diet is to get your body used to use fat to burn energy not carbs. Since you won’t be eating carbs energy has to come from “something” and it can’t be protein. I can’t recall what happens when you have too much protein when doing Keto but it was something scary. In general, I do not recommend the Keto diet without some sort of supervision by your doctor or nutritionist that can watch your process and progress.
Ketogenesis has existed as long as humans have. If you eat a very low amount of carbohydrates, you starve your brain of glucose, its main fuel source. Your body still needs fuel to function, so it taps into your reserve of ketones, which are compounds the liver creates from fat when blood insulin is low. This process is known as ketosis: It’s like when a hybrid car runs out of gas and reverts to pure electricity.

Experts are split on whether the keto diet is a good idea. On the one hand, Lori Chang, registered dietitian and a supervisor at the Center for Healthy Living at Kaiser Permanente West Los Angeles, says using a “cleaner” source of energy—ketones rather than quick-burning carbohydrates—can improve mood and energy levels. When you eat refined carbohydrates or just too many carbs in general, the blood is flooded with excess insulin, Chang says. "This can lead to a blood sugar rollercoaster that stresses the body and negatively impacts energy levels and mood. When you’re in a state of ketosis, however, ketone bodies don’t require insulin to cross the blood-brain barrier, which wards off unfavorable blood sugar levels."
“A lower-carbohydrate diet and lifestyle has not only changed my personal health for the better, but also the health of my family and my patients. The low-carb ketogenic lifestyle has also transformed my medical practice from a traditional sick-care office to an Integrative Wellness practice that focuses on improving people’s health and preventing illness. I enjoy going into work every day as I now feel I am truly preventing chronic diseases from taking root via proper nutritional counseling. I send virtually all my patients to Diet Doctor for help getting started on their own low-carb journey.”
I was a Corpsman (not a corpse-man as some recent somewhat fanatical president would say), and I can tell you many stories of Marines and Sailors who maintained restrictive diets (aka picky eaters). Most obvious was lack of sustaining energy (hypoglycemia) at mile 15 (with 80lbs of gear including a 6.5lb rifle and 200 rnds of ammo, etc.) and depletion of essential vitamins, electrolyte imbalance. They were always the first to collapse and have to hear me scold “see I told you so.” An IV of D5W usually does the trick (D is for dextrose, OMG!)
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