This work was supported by the PronoKal Group® and by grants from the Fondo de Investigacion Sanitaria (PE13/00024 and PI14/01012 research projects) and CIBERobn (CB06/003), Instituto de Salud Carlos III–Subdireccion General de Evaluacion y Fomento de la Investigación; Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional, and the Health Department of the Xunta de Galicia, Spain. D.G.A. is grateful to the Colombian Department of Science, Technology and Innovation – COLCIENCIAS as a recipient of their predoctoral scholarship to support his work. The funding sources had no involvement in the study design, recruitment of patients, study interventions, data collection, or interpretation of the results. A PronoKal representative (I.S.) was involved in the study design and revised the final version of the manuscript, without intervention in the analysis of data, statistical evaluation, or final interpretation of the results of this study.
Research indicates that diets that are high in fat, like the keto diet, do not have a negative impact on cholesterol and triglycerides as long as the carbohydrate intake remains very low. In fact, your cholesterol and triglycerides might actually improve, if you're focusing on eating healthy fats like avocado, olive oil and nuts, not loading up on bacon and burgers.
The popular belief that high-fat diets cause obesity and several other diseases such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cancer has not been observed in recent epidemiological studies. Studies carried out in animals that were fed high-fat diets did not show a specific causal relationship between dietary fat and obesity. On the contrary, very-low-carbohydrate and high-fat diets such as the ketogenic diet have shown to beneficial to weight loss.
A recent systemic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the long-term effects (greater than 1 year) of dietary interventions on weight loss showed no sound evidence for recommending low-fat diets. In fact, low-carbohydrate diets led to significantly greater weight loss compared to low-fat interventions. It was observed that a carbohydrate-restricted diet is better than a low-fat diet for retaining an individual’s BMR. In other words, the quality of calories consumed may affect the number of calories burned. BMR dropped by more than 400 kcal/day on a low-fat diet when compared to a very low-carb diet. 

For some, ketosis can cause more negative than positive side effects. Dorena Rode, a 52-year-old author, and speaker from Occidental, California, tried the diet for a month and experienced heart palpitations and dizziness. Unlike Drew, Rode says her cholesterol increased from 192 to 250 mg/dL after she introduced more fat into her diet. (Less than 200 mg/dL is considered desirable, while anything over 240 mg/dL is considered high.)
Physical activity was determined by means of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), which is used worldwide to indirectly evaluate an individual’s volumes of sedentary behavior and moderate to vigorous physical activity throughout the last seven-day week [26]. It is readily available, very cost-effective, and can generate large data sets. The IPAQ comprises a set of 4 questionnaires. In this study, the short form of the IPAQ was employed (7 items). This measure assesses the types of intensity of physical activity and sitting time that people do as part of their daily lives, which is used to estimate total physical activity in metabolic equivalent task minutes per week (MET-min/week) and time spent sitting [26].

There are vegetables that are high in carbs and others low in carbs. The keto diet recommends sticking to the ones low on carbs but encourages you to eat a lot of them. Best vegetables are all green ones to make it easy. And vegetables that grow above the ground (e.g. lettuce) are always better than the ones that grow below the ground (e.g. potatoes)
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