I’ve been on WFPB diet for 8 months because of high chloresterol and it didn’t drop any, but my husband did the diet with me and his went way down. I have decided to try low carb diet for the next 3 months and do labs to see if it helps. Then I might try keto after that, but between doing WFPB and low carb, I like WFPB best! My doctor said my chloresterol might be “genes”! Loved reading about different diets! I may just need pills or have high chloresterol! Nancy

The ESS is based on questions referring to eight such situations, some known to be very soporific and others less so. The questionnaire is self-administered, and the item scores provide a new method for measuring sleep propensity in eight different real-life situations. Subjects are asked to rate on a scale of 0–3 how likely they would be to doze off or fall asleep in the eight situations, based on their usual, current lifestyle. A distinction is made between dozing off and simply feeling tired. If a subject has not been in some of the situations recently, he or she is asked, nonetheless, to estimate how each might affect him or her [29].
The improvement in glycemic control occurred while medications for diabetes were discontinued or reduced in most participants (Table ​(Table5).5). During the study, hypertension and hyperlipidemia medication doses were not increased from baseline nor were new agents added, except in 3 individuals. No serious adverse effects related to the diet occurred. One participant had a hypoglycemic episode requiring assistance from emergency services after he skipped a meal but the episode was aborted without need for transportation to the emergency room or hospitalization.
A ketogenic diet changes this. When you go keto, your body goes into ketosis, a glycogen-deprived state from the low carb intake. Instead, fat is oxidized to produce energy, resulting in ketones. Unlike glucose, which provides quick bursts of energy, the energy from fat burns slower. As a result, you may avoid sugar crashes right after a high-carb meal being on a keto diet.
In many developing countries, the ketogenic diet is expensive because dairy fats and meat are more expensive than grain, fruit and vegetables. The modified Atkins diet has been proposed as a lower-cost alternative for those countries; the slightly more expensive food bill can be offset by a reduction in pharmaceutical costs if the diet is successful. The modified Atkins diet is less complex to explain and prepare and requires less support from a dietitian.[55]
A lot of people take their macros as a “set in stone” type of thing. You shouldn’t worry about hitting the mark every single day to the dot. If you’re a few calories over some days, a few calories under on others – it’s fine. Everything will even itself out in the end. It’s all about a long term plan that can work for you, and not the other way around.
“The mission of Diet Doctor says it all: Make low carb and keto simple. For over a decade the website has been an invaluable resource for evidence-based nutritional advice and support for anyone seeking to lose weight and improve health with diet. And the results speak for themselves. By building a nutritional safe harbor, available to anyone, anywhere, anytime, Dr. Eenfeldt and the Diet Doctor team have revolutionized the delivery of nutritional information for the greater good of a world that needs it desperately.”
At the first visit, participants were instructed how to follow the LCKD as individuals or in small groups, with an initial goal of ≤20 g carbohydrate per day. Participants were taught the specific types and amounts of foods they could eat, as well as foods to avoid. Initially, participants were allowed unlimited amounts of meats, poultry, fish, shellfish, and eggs; 2 cups of salad vegetables per day; 1 cup of low-carbohydrate vegetables per day; 4 ounces of hard cheese; and limited amounts of cream, avocado, olives, and lemon juice. Fats and oils were not restricted except that intake of trans fats was to be minimized. Participants were provided a 3-page handout and a handbook [11] detailing these recommendations. Participants prepared or bought all of their own meals and snacks following these guidelines.
The goal of a ketogenic diet is to force your body to stop burning its favorite fuel—glucose from the carbs you eat—and start burning fat stores for energy. The body does this by converting the fats to ketones—a state called ketosis. Keto dieters accomplish this digestive feat by cutting way back on their carbohydrate intake. But to do it right, it’s not enough to just guesstimate your carb intake; you could get it wrong and undermine all your efforts. “If you are a beginner to the ketogenic diet, counting carbs is an absolute necessity to avoid frustration in the future,” says Steven Santo, a spokesman for Kegenix/Real Ketones, a keto supplement company. Track your food intake with an app like MyFitnessPal or LoseIt, or just use old-fashioned paper and pen. What you learn may surprise you. “You may be wearing ‘carb-blinders,’ meaning you are unaware of how many carbohydrates you are really consuming in a day,” says Santo. “If you can’t see the number of carbs sneaking into your day, you may be eating many more than you think.”
Whitmire recommends these because they offer omega-3 fatty acids. “Getting more of these fats will improve the ratio of omega-6s to 3s you consume, which some research suggests optimizes health,” she says. For example, an article published in September 2016 in the journal Open Heart cited research that linked consuming more omega-3s and fewer omega-6s (which are high in Western diets) to a lower risk of insulin resistance — the hallmark of type 2 diabetes — and obesity, among other protective health benefits. The USDA says 1 oz of chia seeds has 138 calories, 5 g of protein, 9 g of fat, 12 g of carbs, and a whopping 10 g of fiber (so only 2 net carbs). And also according to the USDA, 1 tbsp of ground flaxseed has 37 calories, 1 g of protein, 3 g of fat, 2 g of carbs, and 2 g of fiber (basically 0 net carbs). Just be sure to buy ground flaxseed so your body can absorb their omega-3s.

“As a physician I was frustrated and distressed by patients’ worsening health and by the spiraling health care costs caused by diabetes, obesity and other chronic conditions, all linked to the food we eat. We help our patients improve their health and optimize their weight with prescribed lifestyle modification, teaching them the link between unhealthy, refined and processed foods and chronic illness. Our growing database of patients who have lost weight and improved cardio-metabolic markers demonstrates the benefits of low-carbohydrate, whole-food diets. In short, reducing the carbohydrate content of our meals controls hunger, promotes weight loss, and improves health.”


We have a super supportive group of “squeakers” over on Facebook who love helping newbies with questions and cheering on everyone’s weight loss progress and Non Scale Victories (NSV’s). Join us over there and see the radical results the SCKC is having on so many people!  And stay tuned for my new book Squeaky Clean Keto – which will include over 120 new SCKC and Whole 30 friendly recipes, and at least 4 weeks of new meal plans!
Basically, carbohydrates are the primary source of energy production in body tissues. When the body is deprived of carbohydrates due to reducing intake to less than 50g per day, insulin secretion is significantly reduced and the body enters a catabolic state. Glycogen stores deplete, forcing the body to go through certain metabolic changes. Two metabolic processes come into action when there is low carbohydrate availability in body tissues: gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis.[4][5]

Carrie, I highly recommend a support group. I personally know a woman “Amanda Rose” who recently lost half her body weight through the Keto Diet and intermittent fasting. You should totally join her Facebook Group. It’s called “Eat Like a Bear” and you can find it by entering the group’s name in the Facebook search bar. She is so amazing and so supportive for people struggling to lose the weight.
Most people will choose to begin their carb-up on Friday night and end it before bed on Saturday. This is usually most convenient as it's when you are off of work and can relax and enjoy the process. If you aren't overly concerned with fat loss and are just using this diet as a way to maintain blood sugar levels, you can likely eat whatever carbohydrate foods you like during this period. If you are worried about fat gain though, then you need the math.
“I am a family physician and co-author of the book The Diabetes Diet. I have been advocating a low-carb diet for patients for the last 16 years — for weight loss weight, cardiac risk reduction, and better blood sugar control in type 1 and 2 diabetes. The diet enables patients with type 1 diabetes to reduce their insulin needs, while patients with type 2 diabetes on insulin may be able to eliminate the drug completely. I leave the choice as to whether the diet needs to be ketogenic or not up to patients, depending on their motivation and goals.”
The ketogenic diet may seem like the Jekyll to the Hyde-like low-fat craze of the 1990s. The bulk of current research finds that the middle ground between the two extremes is more beneficial for overall health. Make it easy for yourself: Eat at least two servings a week of fatty fish (salmon, sardines, mackerel) and cook with a variety of quality fats (olive oil, canola oil, avocado oil) throughout the week.

“As a bariatric surgeon and as a researcher studying the liver for two decades, my research has shown that it is the toxicity of chronic excessive carbohydrate consumption that is the primary cause of obesity and obesity-related co-morbidities. As an obese doctor myself, I was able to lose 90 pounds once I recognized that I had a carbohydrate addiction and so eliminated carbohydrates from my diet. While I have performed more than 8,000 bariatric surgeries, I firmly believe that surgery is only a tool. Obesity and diabetes are not treated by surgery, but rather by the journey to become carbohydrate-free.”
The PSQI questionnaire is a clinical sleep-behavior questionnaire that has been validated for use in patients with insomnia, cancer, Parkinson’s disease, and the general population [30]. The questionnaire is designed to assess indexes of sleep during the preceding month and contains 19 questions that use Likert scales from 0–3. All questions are categorized into the following 7 subvariables: duration of sleep, sleep disturbance, sleep latency, day dysfunction because of sleepiness, sleep efficiency, subjective sleep quality, and use of a sleeping medication. Each of these 7 variables is scored between 0 and 3 arbitrary units (au), which generates a summed total score of 0–21 au. This total score is termed the global sleep score (GSS) with >5 au associated with a poor sleep condition and ≤5 au associated with a good sleep condition.
“It is becoming more apparent that cancer is just another metabolic disease and that insulin and IGF-1 act as cancer growth factors. There is so much science showing that a very-low-carbohydrate diet is more effective at lowering insulin levels than other diets. I educate my patients that diet it is not just about weight but more importantly about metabolic health. I have a number of resources that I recommend to patients and Diet Doctor is at the top of my list.”

Carbohydrate has been wrongly accused of being a uniquely "fattening" macronutrient, misleading many dieters into compromising the nutritiousness of their diet by eliminating carbohydrate-rich food.[26] Low-carbohydrate diet proponents emphasize research saying that low-carbohydrate diets can initially cause slightly greater weight loss than a balanced diet, but any such advantage does not persist.[26][6] In the long-term successful weight maintenance is determined by calorie intake, and not by macronutrient ratios.[7][6]

d) Or does the entire question revert back to a classic calorie counting exercise? In this case, I’ll eat the minimum amount of protein that is needed to prevent my muscles from being cannibalized (for energy) and for the rest, I’ll limit my dietary fat intake per day to a level, where its energy + energy currently obtained from adipose tissue match my total energy need? (I’ll leave gluconeogenesis out of this equation for simplicity.) If this is the case, I’ll lose adipose tissue, i.e. lose weight, but the interesting question still remains: How much energy can my body extract from the adipose tissue at its best? How can I maximize the share of energy coming from adipose tissue instead of dietary fat?

When you eat foods high in carbohydrates and fat, your body naturally produces glucose. Carbohydrates are the easiest thing for the body to process, and therefore it will use them first – resulting in the excess fats to be stored immediately. In turn, this causes weight gain and health problems that are associated with high fat, high carbohydrate diets (NOT keto).
“I am a medical practitioner who has type 1 diabetes. Since adopting a very low-carb lifestyle I have found that day-to-day diabetes management has become so much easier with the added bonus of normal HbA1c. As a result of smaller insulin doses, I am not tied down to strict meal times and can eat when I choose. Similarly, glucose control with exercise is far more predictable. Very low carb for me gives as near to a ‘normal’ life as someone with diabetes can get.”
Achieving optimal ketosis hinges on finding the right balance of macronutrients (or “macros” in keto-speak); these are the elements in your diet that account for the majority of your calories, a.k.a. energy—namely, fat, protein, and carbohydrates. By the way, it’s often “net grams” of carbohydrates that are counted toward your daily intake; “net” deducts the amount of fiber in a food from its carbohydrate total.
“I follow and recommend a low-carb or keto lifestyle, with and without intermittent fasting, to all of my patients whether or not they have lifestyle-related chronic conditions. I do this because of the health benefits to anyone who follows them, but also because of the science behind them and the impressive clinical results I have seen in my patients. I have recommended the Diet Doctor website for the past 5-6 years as a first-stop to find completely trustworthy information, delicious recipes, great visuals and excellent videos.”
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